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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Lubbock Texas
    Posts
    773
    want to share popcorn???

  2. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by TimMcFarland View Post
    The Pentagon used our machines after 911 to get the jet fuel and smoke smell out.
    A big plane did not hit the pentagon
    Last edited by refrigeration mafia; 08-23-2007 at 11:42 PM.

  3. #16
    Hope you plan on leaving the home if you rent his stuff?

    Looks to me like it creates a toxic soup of ozone which is candy coated below. Love how it's compared to natural lightning and the wonderful "thunderstorm effect"

    I think Shaper Image got into trouble with their ozone generators saying stuff like that? Maybe that's why the site is so password protected.

    I think you need to become a professional member to pitch your own site?



    Electrical Discharges (lightning) create an abundance of activated oxygen (O3) in the air.
    These same discharges also create an abundance of negative ions in the air.
    Negative ion generation is referred to as the “Thunderstorm Effect”




    Quote Originally Posted by TimMcFarland View Post
    I use to rent the technology to get rid of mold, before I knew I could own and then sell them. Had one guy who couldn't use his custom van cause meat spoiled in it. He tore out all the carpeting to no avail. He still couldn't use it a month later. Put my machine in there and over night was able to use it. The Pentagon used our machines after 911 to get the jet fuel and smoke smell out. I'm sure it will take care of your problem. You can check out my web site www.freshairliving.com/tim use the password "guest" and or call me at 484-802-6969. Good Luck

    Tim McFarland

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,824
    If (if) you have carpet in THAT room, rip it up. Look at the sub floor. It may hold the answer. If it was the HVAC system the WHOLE house would smell. It's that simple. Something has spilled on the floor, or if you have some sort of wood floor, it's the adhesive, or the something behind the walls.

    Do you have a return in this room? Where are they? Close to this room? Don't be so fast to blame the HVAC system.

  5. #18

    BettyCv, having same problem.

    Betty,

    I'm having the same problem. Have you found out anything additional about your problem? Did installing the ERV help? I'm at that point as well.

    - earl.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,824
    I wish we would hear back from our answers also. So, whats up on this front

  7. #20

    Air Quality

    We've lived in our house for a year and I've been having headaches since about 2 weeks after moving in. It's brand new construction.
    We got home after 2 weeks of vacation and there were so many VOCs in the house that I was dizzy within 10 minutes and it took me 3 days for most of the dizziness to go away.
    We've had the windows open for a month and I'm still a bit dizzy and have headaches.
    Will an ERV recycle the air in my home more than having the windows open? I've also had the furnace fan running in the house to circulate the air. That helps a little bit?
    If having the windows open doesn't clear the air out, which I think would circulate even more air than an ERV, I'm not sure the ERV will be the solution I'm looking for.
    Thoughts?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Lubbock Texas
    Posts
    773
    Read my FAQ page. Might find some some info on there that might point you the right way.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Our new carpet has formaldehyde in it. We have a disclaimer for people with extreme allergies.

    "Most formaldehyde is used in the production of polymers and other chemicals. When combined with phenol, urea, or melamine, formaldehyde produces a hard thermoset resin. These resins are commonly used in permanent adhesives, such as those used in plywood or carpeting. It is used as the wet-strength resin added to sanitary paper products such as (listed in increasing concentrations injected into the paper machine headstock chest) facial tissue, table napkins, and roll towels. They are also foamed to make insulation, or cast into moulded products. Production of formaldehyde resins accounts for more than half of formaldehyde consumption."

    "Occupational exposure to formaldehyde by inhalation is mainly from three types of sources: thermal or chemical decomposition of formaldehyde-based resins, formaldehyde emission from aqueous solutions (for example, embalming fluids), or the production of formaldehyde resulting from the combustion of a variety of organic compounds (for example, exhaust gases). Formaldehyde can be toxic, allergenic, and carcinogenic.[9] Because formaldehyde resins are used in many construction materials, formaldehyde is a known indoor air pollutant.[10] At concentrations above 0.1 ppm in air, formaldehyde can irritate the eyes and mucous membranes, resulting in burning, watery eyes. If inhaled, formaldehyde at this concentration may cause headaches, a burning sensation in the throat, and difficulty breathing, as well as triggering or aggravating asthma symptoms.[11] The United States Environmental Protection Agency USEPA allows no more than 0.016 ppm formaldehyde in the air in new buildings constructed for that agency[12]"




    just my .02 of course I would think it should be gone after 3 years.
    Last edited by BigJon3475; 08-28-2007 at 12:48 AM.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    Wow the inspecter said unit in the basement is causing negative pressure! Thats a first for me! unless you have something way out their it can't happen. Id Go with an HRV to help with the tight home.
    not uncommon at all to have duct leakage, in particular lined floor joists as returns cause a negative pressure in the basement
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,824
    BettyCV,

    You do not need to do anything to the duct system. The duct system is alerting you to a problem. Balancing and sealing the duct will benefit you by directing the conditioned air to the desired rooms, while recirculating the air from said rooms. So the money you are spending on your electric bill will be better utilized. But, it will not solve the "new smell oder" The HVAC system is alerting you to a problem. You state in your first post it has been around for three years. This means to me it is consistent no matter what season it is and is happening only in one room.

    Like I said I would rip the carpet up and look at the sub-floor. Get a moisture meter and check all your walls. If the moisture meter is a bit much for you, I have away around that IF you have an exterminator. Call them and have them take readings on the walls and floor of the house. They do this for termite inspections. They should do it for zip if you have an account.

    If that seems too hard, get a certified home inspector to check the house over. Why a home inspector? It's an un-biased opinion, he has no interest in selling you something to fix the problem, his job it to tell you WHY you have a problem.

    Please let us know what you find

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