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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12

    Confused This might be a couple of simple questions

    Hi All,
    These may be simple questions.
    #1) I just recently had a new condensor coil replaced for AC unit, plus installed new attic insulation. My HVAC unit is in my attic. After the install, I noticed that the air was coming out the vents much stronger than before. I thought this was a good thing, especially since I live in Texas. However I noticed that in the kitchen, dining and utility rooms, which are all located on the other end of my house, the air was barely coming out throught the vents. The degree is very noticeable and as in the utility room there is no air coming out. Again, didn't have this problem before install. I spoke to the installer on the phone about the situation and he denied that his work had anything to do with it. He said he would report it to company owner. I haven't heard from them yet and will be calling this week. I would like this repaired before the hot texas summer gets here. Due to the uneven air distribution, when the temperture rises, I'm sure the differences in room temperture will be more pronounced. My question, is it possible between the install and adding insulation in the attic that these activites in some way may be the culprit?

    #2)Take a look at the pics I've included. Does cold air suppose to come from the plastic pipe sitting vertically (straight up)? When the A/C unit is running, a strong pressure of cold air exits from this pipe. I don't understand, my older unit didn't have this. Why is the air coming out and why is it cold??? It's like I'm trying to cool my attic.

    Any explanations by you pros would be appreciated. BTW here in Dallas, I've dealt with some HVAC people who have just been plain dishonest and I'm sure you guys would not want representing your industry.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    133
    Well for number two, the pipe should be a p-trap like you have under the sink. man talk about a hack job! Both lines are on the same level, I've not done residential in a while, I believe one should be plugged and the other a p-trap. They are your condensate drains. You actually ARE cooling your attic.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,701
    Could the insulation people have stepped on the supplies that are not blowing out as much air as they use to.

    The vertical pipe should have a cap on it.

    The other pvc pipe that points under the coil is also blowing out cold air.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    806
    I would look for either a crushed or disconnected duct in the attic.

    Company should stand behind their work and come out to address your concerns, I'd call until they take care of business.
    Avatar is a tribute to my Great Grandfather, Andrew Stewart. This pin was one of his advertisements for his heating and plumbing business. I never knew him but must of inherited his love of things mechanical since I am the only blue collar worker in the family

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,607
    not enough money in bid for sheet of plywood

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    I'm a homeowner and have something similar to that vertical tube, I am told it is to facilitate pouring a bit of Clorox in to inhibit mold growth. However mine has a soft black plug to seal at other times. That one point sounds like they cheaped out or were negligent on very little things.

    Deny, deny, deny seems to be part of the business plan of some of these less good companies.

    Best of luck -- Pstu

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    I'm a homeowner and have something similar to that vertical tube, I am told it is to facilitate pouring a bit of Clorox in to inhibit mold growth.
    pouring clorox in a drain line is a IAQ (indoor air quality) no-no!



    .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmechanical View Post
    pouring clorox in a drain line is a IAQ (indoor air quality) no-no!



    .
    Did not know that. Is there something else which is not a no-no?

    Thanks -- Pstu

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,701
    I prefer simple green, or non foaming evap coil cleaner.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    Did not know that. Is there something else which is not a no-no?

    Thanks -- Pstu
    ya that smart... remark!



    .

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3
    Did They Give You A Sheet Of Metal To Put Under The Furnace

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12
    Yes, there is a thin piece of sheet metal underneath the furnace. It's not viewable in the picture because of the insulation. I went up in the attic to verify this question. As I was looking probing around the furnace, I found a work glove the technician left

    Update: The company is sending someone out Wednesday to take a look at my complaints. I'll let you guys know how it goes. Thanks for your responses!!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    I am sorry Airmechanical, that you regarded my question as smart-ass. It was totally sincere. I had been told by an HVAC pro that was the solution to a clogged p-trap that resulted in a water leak in an interior wall. It seems common-sense that something is needed to attack mold growth in that drain, I know Clorox is strong for that.

    Regards -- Pstu

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