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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    101

    Question Ok, its installed, now what?

    I have a new furnace, humidifier, indoor coil, electronic filter, outdoor unit. The works. I have never in my life had the luxury of central air. (Where I live in Colorado and we have practically no humidity and there will only be maybe 3 days that even hit 99+ this entire summer. )

    So...I understand the forums policy on DIY but how can I check to make sure my install is running correctly? Its going to be a good month before we have a 90 degree day and I really want to "test this baby out".

    For example...the liquid line feels warm to the touch but not as hot as my neighbors unit. Can I set the thermostat in front of a register and record a temp..if so how cold should it be? Can I take pictures of the unit and post them, not really sure you can tell much just by pics?

    I have done quite a bit of reading around these forums and looked through the walls of "shame and fame". But I need advice on how a homeowner, not a DIY-er could check to verify things are good to go before it gets hot and I am fighting with my installer to come fix what could've been fixed already.

    Yes, I know there are going to be those who say to call my installer...and I do have faith that they did a good job, but I just need to see for myself.

    Thanks!

    also..I was wondering since my unit has R410a, would that make the liquid line feel "not as warm" as one with R22? I just sure that line doesn't feel warm enough.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Hand is not a calibrated tool. Pictures would be nice. Can't really tell you over the net if it's working how it should be. There are to many factors to know what it should be doing by a rule of thumb in my opinion. Does it cool the house?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,886
    You can take pictures and post them, we love that but be prepared to have the job nitpicked to death!

    On a higher SEER unit, liquid line will be somewhat warm not hot like the lower SEER. Really without knowledge, gauges, digital temp probes, you really can't tell too much with feeling lines or testing air temps. You just have to hope you picked an installer who did the right job.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    SW, Michigan
    Posts
    160
    Measure the temperature drop. (return air temp - supply air temp) and let us know.
    GOD knows if you did your best! <><

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Taylors, SC
    Posts
    403
    You would be suprised at what we can tell just by looking at a few pictures. You wouldnt be the first person to post pics of your new gear for all of us to see and comment on.

    As for the liquid line temp, without an exact temp and a few other numbers, there is not much that we can tell you about how it is operating. There are several possiblitys for yours to feel cooler than your neighbors. I wouldnt be overly concerned about this.

    As for the temp. of the air the thing is producing, this also has many variables and no one number is right in all instances. If you take a thermometer and measure the return air, then use the same thermometer to measure the supply air you should be around 18-20 degrees if there is low humidity in the home. If you have a hygrometer to measure the humidity at the return, you can post those numbers on here and we can give you a rough idea of whether or not you are within range.

    Just out of curiosity, why are you questioning the install of the equipment? Are you just wanting to make sure, or did something happen during the install process to make you wonder?
    Poor planning on your part doesn’t necessarily constitute an emergency on my part.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,283
    Your first warm day when you want air conditioning, get a cheap digital thermometer from the store and measure the temperature of the air emerging from a supply register that is the closest one to the air handler. Then measure a return grill that is the closest to the air handler. Subtract the higher from the lower number. This will only be a basic bare bones ballpark estimate of how your system is performing, but an average range is between 16-21 degrees, depending on indoor humidity.

    Your first hot day will be your litmus test.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    101

    Pics

    Ok...I will take some digital pics and you can critique it. I would love to hear some HONEST opinions. Unfortunately, I came across this website the day AFTER my install.

    Can someone point me to some directions on how to go about posting pics on this forum?
    THANKS!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Yorktown VA
    Posts
    281
    oh boy
    Right on....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    853
    I just posted this in another thread. Once you're confident it's performing properly baseline the unit so you have a basis for future evaluation:

    A homeowner should establish a performance baseline when the system is known to be functioning properly. (Typically after it's installed and checked out).

    Measure temp at vent closest to the air handler, measure temp of return air, measure liquid and suction line temps at the air handler and do these measurements at several outdoor ambients. (preferably in 5 or 10 degree increments). Do this for both cooling and heating mode if it's a heat pump.

    Now you have a rough baseline for future comparison. It won't be 100% accurate because there are other factors like RH and air flow but it'll give you a pretty good idea if your system has deviated significantly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by jasruby79 View Post
    Ok...I will take some digital pics and you can critique it. I would love to hear some HONEST opinions. Unfortunately, I came across this website the day AFTER my install.

    Can someone point me to some directions on how to go about posting pics on this forum?
    THANKS!
    If you save the pics to your comp. You will then need a web host like photobucket.com to be able to post the pics. Once you have them saved in something like photobucket you can use the picture button in the message box when you go to post. It will popup asking for "please enter the URL of your image:" Or you can send them to my email address if thats to much trouble and I will post for you...It's up to you. A web host isn't a bad thing to have you'd be surprised how often you'll use it once you have it. Email is in my profile.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    california
    Posts
    54
    please post super heat, sub cool, high pressure and low pressure. picture of it would nice too.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by davefr View Post
    I just posted this in another thread. Once you're confident it's performing properly baseline the unit so you have a basis for future evaluation:

    A homeowner should establish a performance baseline when the system is known to be functioning properly. (Typically after it's installed and checked out).

    Measure temp at vent closest to the air handler, measure temp of return air, measure liquid and suction line temps at the air handler and do these measurements at several outdoor ambients. (preferably in 5 or 10 degree increments). Do this for both cooling and heating mode if it's a heat pump.

    Now you have a rough baseline for future comparison. It won't be 100&#37; accurate because there are other factors like RH and air flow but it'll give you a pretty good idea if your system has deviated significantly.
    How is he going to measure the liquid and suction line temps accurately/consistently and why would that even matter if he doesn't have pressures?

    If he was posting SC and SH I don't really think he would be asking us if it is going to work right. You'll have to get into how this is done and by the way this is the General Discussion Forum.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    california
    Posts
    54
    hey Bigjon3475,

    i just thought about it and i realized that you make sense. if he knows sc and sh, pressure, and ambien temp, then most likely would not be looking for help. he probably be wondering what da hell is sc and sh and be lost about it.

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