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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    5

    Delfield Equipment

    I am fairly new to the service industry and my manager has made me the person who is in charge of service calls on Delfield/McCall units.

    I know there is a ton of Delfield units out there, so do you guys have any advice on how I should approach some common problem units? Also, how is the tech support at Delfield? I'm sure I'll be leaning on them quite a bit until I get more comfortable with the brand.

    I'll probably be visiting this thread a lot with questions, so any advice you guys could give would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    642
    Delfield tech support is good. They are pretty easy. Delfields prep tables & under-counters are either "Custom" models or "Production" models. The Production models are typically the cap-tube models with condensing unit behind the box. The Custom models are typically TXV / liquid line solenoid / pressure-control pump down style models, and the condensing unit is to the side of the box.

    Production models just have a base refrigerator. Sometimes they have cut-outs on top for pans to be dropped in on. But there is no refrigeration for the cold pans, they just get some cooling from the cold air blowing against them from the base evaporator.

    Custom models typically have wrapped cold rails for the pans. Cold rails are either controlled by a low pressure control, but occasionally they have a thermostat. A rocker switch will turn on or off the cold rail. The Base refrigerator will have mullion evaporator coils, typically with a coil-sensing thermostat, liquid line solenoid, & TXV (all inside the evaporator). Occasionally the solenoid for base is also in condensing unit area. LP Switch for cold rail models is like 55# cut in 30# cut-out for R404a (I think).

    Custom models without a cold rail will NOT have a thermostat for the base refrigerator - the entire unit will be controlled by the low pressure control. In this case the LP switch will be like 82# cut-in, 55# cut-out (or something close to that).

    The most common problem with older Delfields (for me) is rotted out evaporator coils, failed thermostats, and occasionally failed TXV powerheads.

    STARTING a few years ago, Delfield began using Danfoss controllers for almost everything. Danfoss controllers have a somewhat bad reputation to me, because they are very sensitive to water & grease; even over-twisting the knob will break them. But they work great when they're not broken. If you are working on newer Delfields you may want to stock some of the common Danfoss kits (which includes controller + probes).

    I remember a while ago it seems they had a bunch of fan blades breaking off of evaporator motors, but haven't seen that in a while.

    A common problem with the Production line models is the door hinge cartridge breaking off. Once this happens the door usually falls off. You can stock the hinge cartridge that is used on many models, without having to stock the entire hinge "kit".

    On upright reach-ins, the really old models used a lot of different control schemes. There is MCII controller which is obsolete. There are freezers with the ERC solid state defrost timers. There are some reach-in pass thru's that will have a coil-sensing t-stat, an air-sensing t-stat, and a defrost timer all wired in series. Many older uprights didn't have a drain line for the evaporator. Instead, they used a pump with a hose called a peristaltic hose to suck condensate water out of the evaporator drain pan. They typically never work and water always drips into the box. Its usually never worth fixing, because if you see a unit that old, the evaporators are probably rotten anyways and its probably almost flat on gas.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for all the information. I've already noticed they have some assembly line units that are rather basic, but some of their custom equipment can be a bit complicated with the variety of controls they have.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,844
    How can I say this without being rude...

    Delfield is a "value line" product. They are used heavily by customers who generally won't pay for maintenance.

    Chris and the others can and will help you, and talking to them is worthwhile. They have a thankless job there, IMHO.

    I know of one chain of casual dining restaurants that has a warehouse of used equipment that they use to populate new locations, and for replacements when the contractor finally says "no mas."

    I have never had a call at these restaurants that did not involve a through cleaning of the coils. On the "pizza prep tables" described above, that can mean removing the drawers and removing the bushel (no kidding here) of lettuce and such that had flown out of the drawers when they were slammed shut by the staff.

    Of course, that vegetation has been there for a LONG time. Use yoiur imagination...

    Coils usually have a sweater on them.

    The aforementioned controllers are NOT found to be reliable. The environment is difficult, and not appropriate for those customers who refuse to have regular, scheduled maintenance. You can either replace the control components (the sensors and module) or you can choose a more reliable method of accomplishing the same purpose of temp control and defrost.

    The ice machines from the Delfiled sister company, Manitowoc, are good machines, but again, no maintenance in many kitchens. I found dozens of auto cleaning systems that stopped working many moons ago, and the machines are so disgusting that I refuse to go to these chain restaurants today as a customer.

    Chain restaurants are TRULY the hind end of the refrigeration business. If you can make money there while you inhibit your gag reflex, then go for it.

    Just being honest.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    562
    ...and don't forget your daily calisthenic warm up, also you might want to practice standing on your head while working with one hand, trying to find things by 'feel' alone, its amazing how I can fit my whole body in one of there undercounter reach ins when changing out a txv. yup, delfield's a pretty good unit...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    5
    Do you guys know if there is any sort of adjustment on a CPR valve on a Delfield Mark 7 unit? And if there is, how does the adjustment effect the performance of the unit?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,509
    Is there a reason why you think the cpr needs adjusting?
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    5
    I had an issue with a unit that would cool the base just fine, but when the rail was on with the base, the rail wouldn't cool very well. If I turned the base off, the rail would barely cool.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,509
    The cpr has nothing to do with that.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    5
    What would be your suggestion 2sac?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,509
    Without any added information, we can't even begin to help with diagnosis. Could be a bad pump, could be low on charge, could be bad txv, could be tubing separated from plate, could be controls set wrong, etc.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    miami,fl.
    Posts
    605
    you must work for your local school board. the company I work for has a lot of big contracts with the local school board. you nailed there equipement in your description. they use delfield for pretty much all of there reach ins and cold rail combo's.
    Quote Originally Posted by trippintl0 View Post
    Delfield tech support is good. They are pretty easy. Delfields prep tables & under-counters are either "Custom" models or "Production" models. The Production models are typically the cap-tube models with condensing unit behind the box. The Custom models are typically TXV / liquid line solenoid / pressure-control pump down style models, and the condensing unit is to the side of the box.

    Production models just have a base refrigerator. Sometimes they have cut-outs on top for pans to be dropped in on. But there is no refrigeration for the cold pans, they just get some cooling from the cold air blowing against them from the base evaporator.

    Custom models typically have wrapped cold rails for the pans. Cold rails are either controlled by a low pressure control, but occasionally they have a thermostat. A rocker switch will turn on or off the cold rail. The Base refrigerator will have mullion evaporator coils, typically with a coil-sensing thermostat, liquid line solenoid, & TXV (all inside the evaporator). Occasionally the solenoid for base is also in condensing unit area. LP Switch for cold rail models is like 55# cut in 30# cut-out for R404a (I think).

    Custom models without a cold rail will NOT have a thermostat for the base refrigerator - the entire unit will be controlled by the low pressure control. In this case the LP switch will be like 82# cut-in, 55# cut-out (or something close to that).

    The most common problem with older Delfields (for me) is rotted out evaporator coils, failed thermostats, and occasionally failed TXV powerheads.

    STARTING a few years ago, Delfield began using Danfoss controllers for almost everything. Danfoss controllers have a somewhat bad reputation to me, because they are very sensitive to water & grease; even over-twisting the knob will break them. But they work great when they're not broken. If you are working on newer Delfields you may want to stock some of the common Danfoss kits (which includes controller + probes).

    I remember a while ago it seems they had a bunch of fan blades breaking off of evaporator motors, but haven't seen that in a while.

    A common problem with the Production line models is the door hinge cartridge breaking off. Once this happens the door usually falls off. You can stock the hinge cartridge that is used on many models, without having to stock the entire hinge "kit".

    On upright reach-ins, the really old models used a lot of different control schemes. There is MCII controller which is obsolete. There are freezers with the ERC solid state defrost timers. There are some reach-in pass thru's that will have a coil-sensing t-stat, an air-sensing t-stat, and a defrost timer all wired in series. Many older uprights didn't have a drain line for the evaporator. Instead, they used a pump with a hose called a peristaltic hose to suck condensate water out of the evaporator drain pan. They typically never work and water always drips into the box. Its usually never worth fixing, because if you see a unit that old, the evaporators are probably rotten anyways and its probably almost flat on gas.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    642
    Hahaha thanks. No I don't work for a school board, but the company I work for is an authorized warranty service provider, and I have gotten to work on my fair share of them. A couple of our accounts use Delfield exclusively. Another one of our big accounts is replacing all broken Kairak equipment with Delfield, so I get to see some newer stuff there.

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