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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    190
    Call me what you want but, I refuse to lie whether its for a job or otherwise. I know for sure I've been turned down at least once because the other guy bs'd his way through the interview. He was a friend of mine and told me what he had told them. I couldn't believe they bought into his story. It eventually came back to haunt him and he is no longer with them Its actually one of the reasons I made that thread asking whether or not employers should test applicants with some pretty basic questions. Had they asked him what sh/sc is, he wouldn't have gotten the job.

    No I don't hate the guy and yes he's still my friend

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    northern Ohio
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    The hardest part of finding "good technicians" is finding someone who gives a damn.
    I can train someone who gives a damn, but if they don't, no amount of training in the world will make them a "good technician."



    Have you ever considered that the one thing in common with all of your problems is.....you.
    there is a group of people out here that do "give a damn". they don't get paid to research problems from their home, learn new things, new equipment, buy tools to do the job better and faster. Chat with other "give a damn" people here and privately about solutions to problems. take care of the customers and trucks the boss so graciously provides. they show up for work on time, keep their mouths shut and do everything in their power to get it done. However it seems to be the fast talkers and cheap labor guys run the show, get their way and leave. They end up "someplace better" for a while then move on. Then we pick up the pieces, tape the wounds and it usually has already started over. these guys keep me busy, keep me out late, and from time to time make me look better than I am. Find someone that wants to be a "good technician" and "teach" him what you know, help him or her learn more, be better than you. And if you find one like that you are very lucky. This guy may not be the one, and I trained my dog, he can get a cold beer from the fridge and close the door. my kids had a harder time with that then becoming professionals and good parents. go figure.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,032
    maybe if they pay is better and don't lay off people every season some one will stick. and bosses should inspect each job after completion for quality purposes and communicate how they want things done. not just install this in that building there. good techs are not found, they're cultivated or cajoled or bribed to join your team. you can't stumble on the good one.

    same with finding wife, you're not stumble on your woman, but perhaps actually putting effort to find the right one. if she's all pretty but can't make a damn meal or budget or take care of children then there's no point of keeping her around. now if she's not the best looking but could do all of those, you could dump time and money into her and make her look all pretty.... lol. but some ppl are just beyond help.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    127
    I think that entry-level pay and work environment in this trade really keep the number of intelligent, hard-working and potentially proficient techs down. Only myself and two other guys that I went to tech school with are still in hvac. The others left to work on bachelors degrees, other trades, or just couldn't cut it (quite a few unintelligent/unmotivated guys). This is my third career choice as an adult. The first two were traveling cable splicer/sweep tech (7 years) and then I tended bar in the French Quarter (4 years). Both of those careers paid about 200-300% better than hvac right out the gate with very little effort and experience. But I got tired of working on the road and restraining myself from strangling whiny tourists. $10/hour is what convicted felons are paid in the city to flip burgers in restaurants...and exactly where I started in hvac. I actually much prefer hvac work to either of my two previous job choices, but after a year and a half experience I am earning roughly what a fat ugly waitress at the Waffle House makes.

    But I do see the up-side to the way this industry treats entry-level techs...the lack of good/experienced techs. The law of supply and demand should push earnings for good techs higher, but apparently this isn't the case in many areas. Unless I decide to get into large commercial or controls (and am lucky enough to get a foot in the door), I think wolfstrike is absolutely right in that it won't be worth it for me unless I take my years of crappy pay and great experience and work for myself. Thank you sir, may have another *year*?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,032
    yes but the fat ugly waitresses at Waffle House will never make anymore money by being a waitress.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    127
    I agree completely...if I didn't think that there was a livable income in the not too distant future I would have to jump ship. I'm just saying the time necessary to get to that level can be prohibitive to many potentially good techs.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South of Heaven
    Posts
    1,148
    Modern " fast track " business practice keeps old dogs on the move. When work slows down the highest paid get cut and no one wants them again until things get busy. This promotes the mediocre mechanic and mentality throughout a company ( " just be good enough to get by bro " ).

    As buildings get more efficient ( heating ) the more we will become migrant seasonal workers for air conditioning. I think I'll go down south in the winter and come back up in the summer. I'll auction myself to the highest bidder , it might sound something like this ...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnbtdpyVIBY

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    tip of the mitt
    Posts
    1,974
    I had a tech that was with the company for over ten years but alas weed was legalized in michigan and that was that.
    I have my own little world. But it's OK...they know me here.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Delaware,United States
    Posts
    116
    The company I work for is small just myself and another tech the last few months we worked our a** off pulling over 20k a month now we slacked off and its stay home makes no sense this is what makes me want to leave the trade its almost your only good as your last call

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,627
    Quote Originally Posted by tech45 View Post
    Modern " fast track " business practice keeps old dogs on the move. When work slows down the highest paid get cut and no one wants them again until things get busy. This promotes the mediocre mechanic and mentality throughout a company ( " just be good enough to get by bro " ).

    As buildings get more efficient ( heating ) the more we will become migrant seasonal workers for air conditioning. I think I'll go down south in the winter and come back up in the summer. I'll auction myself to the highest bidder , it might sound something like this ...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnbtdpyVIBY
    Big fan of Hank. Never heard that before. Not sure what I think.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,627
    Quote Originally Posted by cajunhvac75 View Post
    I think that entry-level pay and work environment in this trade really keep the number of intelligent, hard-working and potentially proficient techs down. Only myself and two other guys that I went to tech school with are still in hvac. The others left to work on bachelors degrees, other trades, or just couldn't cut it (quite a few unintelligent/unmotivated guys). This is my third career choice as an adult. The first two were traveling cable splicer/sweep tech (7 years) and then I tended bar in the French Quarter (4 years). Both of those careers paid about 200-300% better than hvac right out the gate with very little effort and experience. But I got tired of working on the road and restraining myself from strangling whiny tourists. $10/hour is what convicted felons are paid in the city to flip burgers in restaurants...and exactly where I started in hvac. I actually much prefer hvac work to either of my two previous job choices, but after a year and a half experience I am earning roughly what a fat ugly waitress at the Waffle House makes.

    But I do see the up-side to the way this industry treats entry-level techs...the lack of good/experienced techs. The law of supply and demand should push earnings for good techs higher, but apparently this isn't the case in many areas. Unless I decide to get into large commercial or controls (and am lucky enough to get a foot in the door), I think wolfstrike is absolutely right in that it won't be worth it for me unless I take my years of crappy pay and great experience and work for myself. Thank you sir, may have another *year*?
    I agree. BUT the industry is at fault. Are we(industry as a whole) not our own worst enemy? Now, I'm not a business owner. I have worked for 3 shops in 15 years. 2 of the shops would gamble on cheap help and worse comes to worse, they send out a qualified guy. Their customer base had something to do with these decisions. The 3rd shop had employed only experienced techs and they were more interested in providing quality work than quantity work. That shop was never busy. I understand that hvac companies are in business to make money. What I don't understand, and maybe this should be another thread, is why all the gambling. I know accounts are lost because of customers budget. I also know accounts are lost because of ineptness. How many times are you going to send out a $12 guy to fix a cap tube system he knows nothing about because he was never taught, and then send the same guy to work on a rack because he's a body and hopefully he is smart enough to use the radio to call the guy who should be there in the first place? We have no standard in the industry. NATE and RSES and the unions are competing against cheap labor. The trade schools are completely worthless. On top of all that, equipment makers are manufacturing stuff that is either idiot proof OR needs a computer programmer to work on it. Sorry to say, we get what we deserve.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    5,701

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South of Heaven
    Posts
    1,148
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    More often than not , I call " PURE GREED ". No one wants to pay that high paid talented air conditioning guru in December. A fast track modern accountant will recommend cutting this guy at the first sign of slow down. I hear the " loyalty " question all the time from owners , thiers is with their accountant.

    2sac - that is not the same " Hank " , lol.

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