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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    northern Ohio
    Posts
    126

    has anybody used water cooled heads?

    I've heard of them on low temp compressors before but never seen them. I have a low temp 5H120 that I'm told has a history of "BAKING" the compressor. The maint. staff at this site has told me that once or twice a year the compressor is changed and they have a spare on hand. they send the cooked one out to a local rebuilder and it has been this way for many years. This system cools glycol to -22deg.C, that is used to cool chemical reactions thru heat exchangers during mixing. My first check, on an 80deg day had head temps around 235deg. my superheat at the compressor is only 20/25deg. and the eevs (4) all seem accurate and set at 3deg. . liquid sub-coolers (1 each evap) and not much more separate the evaps from the comp. I have requested some guidance from Carlyle and expect a response later this week. I'm not sure "head coolers " are even a good idea yet, seems like there may be more going on here that I haven't figured out . Maybe a different refrigerant, currently using 408-a, I can't believe this system was designed to be like this. And where does the water come from? another chiller? This has the makings of a real clusterf___, and I don't give-up until they stop paying me. "my shrink told me that one"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Flat Rock, NC
    Posts
    463
    Water cooled heads are quite common on these, and needed with that operating envelope. Use a glycol pump and fan coil to reject heat if no cooling tower water is available. Most of my systems incorporate a flow proving switch to prevent comp. damage. You only need 2 or3 gpm
    .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    northern Ohio
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by codgy View Post
    Water cooled heads are quite common on these, and needed with that operating envelope. Use a glycol pump and fan coil to reject heat if no cooling tower water is available. Most of my systems incorporate a flow proving switch to prevent comp. damage. You only need 2 or3 gpm
    .
    thanks codgy, got application form from RSC and "it is in the works".

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    991
    Quote Originally Posted by refrigeration johnny View Post
    I've heard of them on low temp compressors before but never seen them. I have a low temp 5H120 that I'm told has a history of "BAKING" the compressor.........
    Is there any hybrid hope of an Earth-Coupled pond or horizontal bore-loop ? A Dairy queen design is in the 7-ton range, well using heat reclaim and fluid-cooling some things.

    PE 3408 pipe has a wide and usually acceptable temp range in some very moist apps in ground to some say to 120 f.
    I have used for process cooling test equipment to 106 entering the pond loops at 11 ft deep on 7ft dia by 6" spaced (tube-tube) coil sets.
    ... however, much work still needs to be done.
    CLOSED LOOP newer ratings are listed, but in numerical EER's Closed- is posted below OPEN LOOP EER's:

    http://www.energystar.gov/productfin...r=0&lastpage=1

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    35
    You might check to see if that comp has a liquid injection port. If so you could put a 190 valve on it. It's is a small Txv that measures discharge temp and dumps a small amount of liquid into the cylinder when the discharge temp exceeds 190 degrees

    Thanks

    Mike

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