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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Hmm Cooling Capacity of a water chiller.

    Hello guys

    I am new in this trade and I need some help with this :

    What is the cooling capacity of a water chiller operating with a 40 F evaporating temperature , return water temperature of 50 F and a 45 F supply water temperature if the water flow rate is mesured at 200 Gal./min ???

    If is possible I would like an explication not only the simple answer .

    Thank you in advance .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    South Georgia
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    A gallon of fresh water(not glycol) weighs 8.34 pounds. 8.34 multiplied by 60 (min/hour)= 500.
    200 gpm multiplied by 500; multipied by drop in degrees F.
    200 X 500 X 5.

    divide that answer by 12,000 and you get tons of refrigeration.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Thank you very much for your answer.
    That means 500 is a constant and I substract the supply water temp from return water temp which mean delta t . My question is what about 40 F evap. TEMP?? We make abstraction of that value?
    The reason why I asked this is that in the ( RED SEAL CANADA ) refrigeration cetification sample question it is that question and the right answer was 600 000 Btu / h .As per above calculation means 500 000 Btu/H. That why I was puzzled.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Mixing oil and fire with a big spoon.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derince View Post
    ...The reason why I asked this is that in the ( RED SEAL CANADA ) refrigeration cetification sample question it is that question and the right answer was 600 000 Btu / h .As per above calculation means 500 000 Btu/H. That why I was puzzled.
    somebody fat fingered the answer key. 500k is correct unless they were using a different gallon measurement like 'imperial gallons'. if using imperial gallons per minute, the answer would have been 416,670 btuh...so that's not it.

    reversing the formula (and using US gallons), we get a weight per gallon of 10 lbs. which would be more like having a glycol or something, but even that doesn't change that much.

    fat fingered.
    Someday, I hope to be just as brave as Harry Stamper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
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    Propylene Glycol is 8.61 pounds per gallon while water is 8.34 pounds per gallon.

    ~ 3.24% heavier , if 100% per gal

    so: J say... more rightly so
    Process cooling: NO COMPRESSORS Earth-Coupled since 1996
    ... however, much still needs to be hybridized energy transfer.

    CLOSED LOOP 2015 listed EER's
    even 49+ now; and "blended from low to high variable speeds" for 32deg.F ~ E-Star

    Perhaps you need a 32F Chiller/HW-Heat: buy a GEO-T Heat Pump (GHP with Heat-Recovery)
    http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?...mal_heat_pumps

    http://www.hydro-temp.com/products.html and Bosch/Carrier and AquasystemsInc.com

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