Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Help with choosing a thermostat

    I recently purchased a remodeled home that has new central heat and air installed. I need a new thermostat for various reasons. I'm out of town usually weekdays but my schedule can vary at times so I definitely need a programmable thermostat and one with wifi support preferably so if i am gone for an extended stay that is unplanned I can change my thermostat from my phone or computer. Now my dilemma is like many home owners in that my home has an upstairs that is generally warmer than the downstairs. The home is well insulated with r19 in the walls (they are an oddball wall at around 2x7). Overhead is blown in and windows are all new. I would like a thermostat that will support a wireless thermostat I can put upstairs and will either average out the temperatures or will let one over ride the other when the upstairs is above a set temperature. Also I'm looking into retrofit zone systems so I'd like a thermostat that can support that. Any help choosing a thermostat would be appreciated and also some info on these retrofit zone systems in case the remote sensor doesn't help the problem enough. Thanks.
    -Derek

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    13
    The Laws of Physics are pretty well in place, warm air rises. Air like water tends to flow in the path of least resistance. So that is what you strategy is up against. There are several zone systems that can allow you to add a damper if what you need is simple upstairs, downstairs control of the airflow in your home. I would suggest however that you call your HVAC contractor and ask them to evaluate your current system. Airflow is simple in concept, but the application of technology can be tricky. You also need to be aware of the return air requirements for your system. The important thing about picking a zoning system, Identify your use pattern and decide what rooms can be served together. If you do that, your conversation with your contractor will start off on a better note, and he will know that your priority is to build more control comfort in your home, not just apply thermostat technology.

    The choice of a thermostat is getting more complicated. I can tell you I use the Ecobee system and have found it to be feature rich and "fairly easy" to learn. I have seen the Nest product used successfully, and there are many other models out there depending on what you want for a dashboard and your budget. Make sure you need the bells & whistles you are paying for. I really don't go to my thermostat for a weather report...

  3. #3
    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum, and only Pro members that have been vetted by the AOPC may post advise, commentary, or ask questions of the OP here.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Further infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Last edited by beenthere; 08-15-2013 at 05:14 PM. Reason: Non Pro * member

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    1,395
    I like the Honeywell Prestige. We use it at home and our customers rave about it, too. You'll need to get a Red-link Gateway for wifi use, but the app and use of it are free.
    We have a Portable Comfort Control that we can move to different areas of the house.

    As for the warmer upstairs situation, you need air circulation up there. Zoning is the best solution but you'll need a dedicated duct to that level. It may involve considerable expense.
    I usually advise customers to turn the thermostat fan switch to "on" to circulate air constantly. That will reduce the temperature difference between floors but it also causes moisture on the coil at the end of a cooling cycle to be evaporated back into the air.
    A variable speed motor for the furnace will use a lower blower speed for fan only cycles. It is more comfortable than high blower speed .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,418
    I have a new Prestige and it is constantly reporting receiving faults from my heat pump. Trouble is, I don't have a fault signal from my heat pump hooked up. Driving me crazy, Honeywell has no idea what's up. But generally I'd trust Honeywell over many of the others. Nests have been good for biz, mostly since they have a lousy manual and lousy tech support in my experience. We've put in 1 Ecobee. I set it up with the equipment, it was up to the HO to get it online. I imagine he did.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,821
    TennesseePhil, this is the Ask Our Pro's forum, and only Pro members that have been vetted by the AOPC may post advise, commentary or ask questions of the OP here.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Your post has been deleted.
    Further infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SW MO.
    Posts
    5,069
    Sounds like you would be a good candidate for a Nest thermostat.

    http://nest.com/inside-and-out/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    1,395
    Quote Originally Posted by chaard View Post
    Sounds like you would be a good candidate for a Nest thermostat.

    http://nest.com/inside-and-out/
    How can you tell he drives a Prius?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event