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Thread: leak check

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Chapel Hill
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    leak check

    I did a leak check with a co-worker on a goodman 3 ton heat pump today. The heat pump is using R 22 not 410a
    we used CO2 and blue bubble to check all of the welded joints. When i am about to shoot 350 psi on the high side.
    my co-worker said it is not high enough, then we shoot 400 psi to it.
    I did use 400 psi for leak check on a coil and i busted the coil once, then i don't use any high psi since then.
    What is the right psi or the right way for leak check ? Is it ok to use 400 psi for leak check?

    any suggestion or anyone busted coil like i did before??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
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    New install or existing unit? And with R22 I wouldn't go up to 400; 410a I would.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Chapel Hill
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    It is a new install , but so far we did not busted the coil today........ Thank god...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Chicagoland Area
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    4,565
    You used CO2 to leak check?
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Chapel Hill
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    You used CO2 to leak check?

    Sorry, i mean nitrogen.

  6. #6
    New install? R22? Must be dry condensor...I usually check nameplate for Max pressure and stay close to it...I'm doing a leak check on a 20 yr old split sys.will be isolating evaporator..condensor..n lineset ...bet on the evaporator

  7. #7
    400 psi is too much for 22, and not necessary. How quick is the system leaking out when charged?? Days, weeks, years? Check for signs of oil. If there aren't any tell tale signs of leaks I would charge a trace amount of refrigerant, then top off with nitrogen and use a leak checker to get close. I personally favor blu, when I get close to the problem. Does the line set run in the wall or any place not accessible?? Once you find leak and repair, pull quick vac and recharge system with N2 and let sit...I prefer to do this to be positive there aren't anymore leaks in system--i sleep better at night knowing the problem is solved!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Ripley, WV
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    1,157
    A little trace of R-22 with some nitrogen and an H-10 leak detector and the leak will be reveled.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Chapel Hill
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    Quote Originally Posted by fernandes View Post
    New install? R22? Must be dry condensor...I usually check nameplate for Max pressure and stay close to it...I'm doing a leak check on a 20 yr old split sys.will be isolating evaporator..condensor..n lineset ...bet on the evaporator
    Yes, it is a dry unit. However, we still can't find the leak yet.....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Chapel Hill
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeep!_r View Post
    400 psi is too much for 22, and not necessary. How quick is the system leaking out when charged?? Days, weeks, years? Check for signs of oil. If there aren't any tell tale signs of leaks I would charge a trace amount of refrigerant, then top off with nitrogen and use a leak checker to get close. I personally favor blu, when I get close to the problem. Does the line set run in the wall or any place not accessible?? Once you find leak and repair, pull quick vac and recharge system with N2 and let sit...I prefer to do this to be positive there aren't anymore leaks in system--i sleep better at night knowing the problem is solved!!
    It is leaking every 3-4 months, and few different guys already there for leak check. Nothing can be found so far. My boss would like me to take out the indoor coil and seal it nitrogen, then put it inside a big water tank.
    Just to see if we can see any bubbles....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob_in_WV View Post
    A little trace of R-22 with some nitrogen and an H-10 leak detector and the leak will be reveled.
    Which brand of H-10 leak detector is the best?
    Johnson? GE??

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    McQueeney, Texas
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    3,797
    I don't see any reason to exceed 250 on any leak to be honest. I find all the leaks at 80-150 just fine. Spray or dab the soap on, go get a drink of water, cool off, then go back and look for foamy bubbles- it may take quite a few minutes.

    The higher psi might just show the leak faster, but may not show a faster leak as it blows the soap away from the surface sometimes.

    I use a magnifying glass to really see the leak if I suspect one.

    I agree with using a little r22 with the nitro and the H10- you WILL find it this way. I do this with r410 systems after a pump down if I have a hard time finding a leak.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,874
    Maybe time to break out with dye! I hate the stuff! But, it's sometimes necessary!

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