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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,277
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian GC View Post
    How quickly people forget what they say just to CYA.

    You also embellished the original statement of "I have an infant in the car" to "I have an infant locked in the car". There is a big difference.

    Have you ever been out with an infant before? Her impatience could have been very justified.

    Go try to be a hero somewhere else with your free, socialized government services. But I can understand how a Paramedic could forget who pays his fat salary and pension.
    You know Brian, you are THE most ignorant excuse of a person on this forum and I take your last comment as a personal attack. Let me set the record straight for one of your asinine charges: "fat salary". In the first place, paramedics are hourly non-exempt employees meaning they are not on a fixed salary. I was a shift supervisor in the best paying EMS in South Carolina and my top pay equated to $27K per year. Now, I worked 24hrs on/ 48 off. Every 2 week cycle, I was required to be 'on call'. That meant if anyone called in sick or for any reason could not report for duty, I got to work a double. I can assure you that you have no clue how exhausting that is. I had several instances where I got stuck on the ambulance running calls into the third day. I once worked 52 hours straight without a wink of sleep. Now, when there was a major incident such as a pile up on the InterState Highway or a Train derailment, I was subject to being called in against my will. They could, if need be, send a SC State Trooper to pick me up. Even when on-call, you had to hang around for a few hours at HQ until the dust settled before that one hour drive home and there could be a voicemail there ordering me to turn around and drive back. Also at this time I was living off $10/ 24 hr. shift-$5 for gas and $5 for food. I usually stopped by the three main hospitals in our city under the guise of collecting equipment such as backboards and splints but in reality, it was to raid the nurse's lounge for any free food. Sometimes people would bring cakes and cookies. On a RARE occasion there was pizza left over from the night shift. That and some of those free Saltine crackers from the coffee pot were lunch. Hmm good! We were harassed to turn in detailed checkout sheets within 15 min. of reporting for duty and got written up if not turned in by noon even if you were stuck humping calls. That meant you had to complete a 5 page checklist of the truck, a three page checklist of the drug kit noting expiration dates, condition of packaging, etc., and another sheet on your quarters or substation. If the offgoing crew left a mess, such as blood visible in the unit, you got written up if you didn't write that crew chief up for turning over a dirty or unstocked unit. On each call, we had to complete our State run report, which was our legal record so you had to cram in all the detail you could, the County billing form, Medicare form if applicable, prepare and attach an EKG strip on every call you performed advanced procedures, an equipment inventory card signed by the receiving nurse when you had to leave equipment on the patient, then special studies forms such as treatments for cardiac arrests or asthma patient responses to therapy including the first arterial blood gases from the hospital. All this paperwork had to be doube checked by the crew chief and initialed. When he turned it in to me, I had to review it, including the NCR copies to ensure it went through. If it was not filled in correctly or there was a medical question about the care a crew gave, I had to write up the crew chief or be written up myself. Sometimes, when we were very short, I'd have to crew an ambulance and still do all my supervisory chores on time or else. Also, during all this, if there was a motor vehicle accident with entrapment, I had to respond with the rescue truck and the Jaws of Life. I had to meet crews who were stuck humping calls and supply them with fresh batteries for their heart monitor, radio, or critical supplies or intervene between a crew chief and an angry MD. When there was a hostage situation, I got stuck on scene for HOURS doing nothing while the work piled up. I had to drive around the county and inspect every substation and the County shed to ascertain the status of all spare vehicles as they broke down constantly and I was always switching crews out. Once every two weeks, we had mandatory training at HQ. You had to hang around off the clock or drive in to HQ for a three hour intensive training off the clock. We had other mandatory training that was off the clock all the time ranging from updates on medical procedures to rescue hands on drills to crime scene recognition and preservation from LEO or emergency vehicle driving at the SC Highway Patrol Pursuit Driving course. We also were required to take mandatory certification courses all the time for basic, advanced and pediatric CPR and I had to maintain my instructor rating. I also had to maintain my instructor rating for basic and advanced trauma life support certs. Then, every three years, you were required by the State to take an additional 80hr. refresher course for your certification.

    So big boy, yes, we really had it great with all that spare time off lounging at my luxury resort enjoying all those megabucks rolling in. Actually, I got off duty at 2 am while a supervisor and faced a one hour drive home through a swamp while exhausted. I showered and crashed then had to get up and watch the kids all day not being able to sleep until they went to bed around 8pm. That left me one day off to do anything. In 13 years I had both Christmas and Christmas Eve off once. On some summer days during a heat wave, I've drank two gallons of water in a 6 hour period and not had to pee due to the sweating from exertion. In fact, the ER attending physician more than once shut down me and my crews to run a bag of IV fluids into us so we didn't get heat exhaustion. Yep, we were lazy bums enjoying the life of Reilly getting fat off the County's taxes. Of course, there was that little bit, too about getting shot at, almost stabbed, getting bitten, clawed, punched, kicked, spit on, hair torn, excreted on using every bodily fluid imaginable and a few you cannot imagine, entering very hazardous locations and situations, risking your life constantly, driving in traffic code 3, almost got run over by a train, daily exposed to blood, which includes HIV, Hepatitis B, etc,, other communicable diseases, handling human babies burnt to a crisp or a person splattered in some accident, entering a nuclear fuels plant, river rescue, etc, etc. Oh, yes, when I started, we were required to perform mouth to mouth resuscitation without any sort of shield between you and the patient. I've been in the State prison during riots where I couldn't see because of the tear gas making my eyes tear and us puke while watching to see you didn't get jumped. I've done high level rescues using all sorts of means including riding a bucket off a 100ft. crane. We had locals break into our vehicles and HQ to rip us off. Yep, very glamorous overpaid position to me.

    So Brian, please don't take this wrong but you can go to H#LL!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,626
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    You know Brian, you are THE most ignorant excuse of a person on this forum and I take your last comment as a personal attack. Let me set the record straight for one of your asinine charges: "fat salary". In the first place, paramedics are hourly non-exempt employees meaning they are not on a fixed salary. I was a shift supervisor in the best paying EMS in South Carolina and my top pay equated to $27K per year. Now, I worked 24hrs on/ 48 off. Every 2 week cycle, I was required to be 'on call'. That meant if anyone called in sick or for any reason could not report for duty, I got to work a double. I can assure you that you have no clue how exhausting that is. I had several instances where I got stuck on the ambulance running calls into the third day. I once worked 52 hours straight without a wink of sleep. Now, when there was a major incident such as a pile up on the InterState Highway or a Train derailment, I was subject to being called in against my will. They could, if need be, send a SC State Trooper to pick me up. Even when on-call, you had to hang around for a few hours at HQ until the dust settled before that one hour drive home and there could be a voicemail there ordering me to turn around and drive back. Also at this time I was living off $10/ 24 hr. shift-$5 for gas and $5 for food. I usually stopped by the three main hospitals in our city under the guise of collecting equipment such as backboards and splints but in reality, it was to raid the nurse's lounge for any free food. Sometimes people would bring cakes and cookies. On a RARE occasion there was pizza left over from the night shift. That and some of those free Saltine crackers from the coffee pot were lunch. Hmm good! We were harassed to turn in detailed checkout sheets within 15 min. of reporting for duty and got written up if not turned in by noon even if you were stuck humping calls. That meant you had to complete a 5 page checklist of the truck, a three page checklist of the drug kit noting expiration dates, condition of packaging, etc., and another sheet on your quarters or substation. If the offgoing crew left a mess, such as blood visible in the unit, you got written up if you didn't write that crew chief up for turning over a dirty or unstocked unit. On each call, we had to complete our State run report, which was our legal record so you had to cram in all the detail you could, the County billing form, Medicare form if applicable, prepare and attach an EKG strip on every call you performed advanced procedures, an equipment inventory card signed by the receiving nurse when you had to leave equipment on the patient, then special studies forms such as treatments for cardiac arrests or asthma patient responses to therapy including the first arterial blood gases from the hospital. All this paperwork had to be doube checked by the crew chief and initialed. When he turned it in to me, I had to review it, including the NCR copies to ensure it went through. If it was not filled in correctly or there was a medical question about the care a crew gave, I had to write up the crew chief or be written up myself. Sometimes, when we were very short, I'd have to crew an ambulance and still do all my supervisory chores on time or else. Also, during all this, if there was a motor vehicle accident with entrapment, I had to respond with the rescue truck and the Jaws of Life. I had to meet crews who were stuck humping calls and supply them with fresh batteries for their heart monitor, radio, or critical supplies or intervene between a crew chief and an angry MD. When there was a hostage situation, I got stuck on scene for HOURS doing nothing while the work piled up. I had to drive around the county and inspect every substation and the County shed to ascertain the status of all spare vehicles as they broke down constantly and I was always switching crews out. Once every two weeks, we had mandatory training at HQ. You had to hang around off the clock or drive in to HQ for a three hour intensive training off the clock. We had other mandatory training that was off the clock all the time ranging from updates on medical procedures to rescue hands on drills to crime scene recognition and preservation from LEO or emergency vehicle driving at the SC Highway Patrol Pursuit Driving course. We also were required to take mandatory certification courses all the time for basic, advanced and pediatric CPR and I had to maintain my instructor rating. I also had to maintain my instructor rating for basic and advanced trauma life support certs. Then, every three years, you were required by the State to take an additional 80hr. refresher course for your certification.

    So big boy, yes, we really had it great with all that spare time off lounging at my luxury resort enjoying all those megabucks rolling in. Actually, I got off duty at 2 am while a supervisor and faced a one hour drive home through a swamp while exhausted. I showered and crashed then had to get up and watch the kids all day not being able to sleep until they went to bed around 8pm. That left me one day off to do anything. In 13 years I had both Christmas and Christmas Eve off once. On some summer days during a heat wave, I've drank two gallons of water in a 6 hour period and not had to pee due to the sweating from exertion. In fact, the ER attending physician more than once shut down me and my crews to run a bag of IV fluids into us so we didn't get heat exhaustion. Yep, we were lazy bums enjoying the life of Reilly getting fat off the County's taxes. Of course, there was that little bit, too about getting shot at, almost stabbed, getting bitten, clawed, punched, kicked, spit on, hair torn, excreted on using every bodily fluid imaginable and a few you cannot imagine, entering very hazardous locations and situations, risking your life constantly, driving in traffic code 3, almost got run over by a train, daily exposed to blood, which includes HIV, Hepatitis B, etc,, other communicable diseases, handling human babies burnt to a crisp or a person splattered in some accident, entering a nuclear fuels plant, river rescue, etc, etc. Oh, yes, when I started, we were required to perform mouth to mouth resuscitation without any sort of shield between you and the patient. I've been in the State prison during riots where I couldn't see because of the tear gas making my eyes tear and us puke while watching to see you didn't get jumped. I've done high level rescues using all sorts of means including riding a bucket off a 100ft. crane. We had locals break into our vehicles and HQ to rip us off. Yep, very glamorous overpaid position to me.

    So Brian, please don't take this wrong but you can go to H#LL!
    You obviously worked for the wrong precinct. The firemen down the street from me do nothing but shine those million dollar trucks, collect their six figure pay while waiting for their big pension payday.

    If those jobs were so bad why are people clamoring at the bit to get those jobs?

    Oh, and I wasn't talking about you, rather firemen in general.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,277
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian GC View Post
    You obviously worked for the wrong precinct. The firemen down the street from me do nothing but shine those million dollar trucks, collect their six figure pay while waiting for their big pension payday.

    If those jobs were so bad why are people clamoring at the bit to get those jobs?

    Oh, and I wasn't talking about you, rather firemen in general.
    Now let me quote you again, Quote Originally Posted by Brian GC View Post
    How quickly people forget what they say just to CYA.

    You are talking out your butt so fast you can't keep up with yourself. So have shown so much ignorance on this forum and especially here on this thread. Just to help you understand a few things so you don't keep tripping over your own tongue:
    -most paramedics and EMTs are NOT firefighters
    -when you have paramedics as part of a fire dept., it is usually located within a large liberal city where the have unions
    -As I stated, where I worked as the TOP PAYING service in my state at the time. When i started in EMS in 1979, I left a job doing triage in the Emergency Room waiting area at $5/hr. and took a position with the paid EMTs, who were based out of my county's hospital. We worked from 9am to 10pm at $5.50/hr. Then all but two went home. The two who remained were off the clock unless they ran a call. The rest were off the clock but on call. If you got called in, you drive back in, clocked in, waited 5-10 min. for the other crew to arrive, clocked out and went home. Some nights I lost $15 just in gas. If you factor in the on-call, I was making less than half of min. wage or around $14K/yr. which was $2K more than a starting cop made in my hometown at the time. When I went to the State Capital, I got a $4K raise on the spot. Big bucks in those days ('84). Most of those guys are making about $35K now. So, I don't know where you're getting your figures from except when you talk about officers working in unionized fire depts, then it goes off the charts. If you do a search of the highest paid civil servants in the county, most are from San Francisco as fire captains who make $200-500K/yr. The highest btw is a nurse making almost $800k/yr. and that's about a yr old so it may be higher.

    Those shiney trucks do cost about $200K apiece for a basic pumper now and those shiney trucks are protecting your butt. However, if you think all they do is sit around and shine those trucks go down there and hurl that accusation at them. You'll be needing a paramedic after they are through with you and your big mouth.

    Some paramedics are completely volunteer running out of rescue squads. A lot of the country is like that. A few are hospital based services and a some are county based as mine was just like the Sheriff's dept or highway maintenance. There were no precincts--that's a big city concept where you have only unions. So, it would seem that as you wipe the lipstick off your butt, it would appear you have based your asinine comments on totally incorrect information once again, meanwhile offending me to such a degree the English language does not have the words of contempt I hold for you and your ignorance displayed here. Do the world a favor Brian: for once in your life so find out the facts in a matter before you make a fool of yourself by opening your pie hole.

    Now, go hang your head in shame for your hypocrisy for forgetting what you said just to, in your words, CYA.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,043
    Okay Brian and Hearthman, please move away from this conversation its obviously getting too personal for the forum.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    18,144
    I have a buddy that lives in NC and is a EMT 3. He sent me some photos recently of him and others practicing diving rescues. He practically lives at the hospital if he is not in his trailer.

    He likes to say that he lives the life of a Spartan.
    To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order, we must put the family in order; to put the family in order, we must cultivate our personal life; and to cultivate our personal life, we must first set our hearts right.
    -- Confucius

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,228

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    So when she walked out did she leave the other crumb cruncher hanging on your leg?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    647
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    So when she walked out did she leave the other crumb cruncher hanging on your leg?
    LOL She left one kid in the car and the other in the doctor's office.
    And she probably has a coffee mug that says "World's Best Mom"

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    So when she walked out did she leave the other crumb cruncher hanging on your leg?
    Yeah, I booted him in the ass. The kid was surprisingly well behaved. He was quiet and aside from grabbing onto my knee, acted much better than most kids at restaurants.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    8,105
    Never see kids at our doctor...... mostly middle aged folk like myself and older.

    Of course some of those folks have poor hygeine..... but you can always just get up and stand away from them.

    Do you know that even when Ive been hurt fairly badly that I go home and take a shower and put on clean clothes first..... Ive been cut bad, burned bad....broke my foot..... been sick as a dog..... and I always go home first and clean up.

    Dont take my phone in.... got my stuff ready when they ask for it....

    Im glad I dont live in some kind of hell hole city like some of you guys do......

    Of course I wouldnt boot some kid in the ass for grabbing my leg...... but I would slice his mamas face to pieces if she left a baby or child alone in a car.....

    Slice her up right there in the parking lot...... any witnesses Id simply tell that if the cops are called Ill kill everyone there......one day..... and their families and pets too...... then Ill burn their houses down and take a sledgehammer to their gravestones...... after I drop the kraken off on top of each and every one of their graves.

    Yep.... Im that much of a bada**
    YOU SHALL REAP WHAT YOU HAVE _______ SOWN

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    8,105
    Im bad to the bone....

    Cue George Thorogood and the Destroyers

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i6anTAQqnw
    YOU SHALL REAP WHAT YOU HAVE _______ SOWN

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kaufman county, Texas
    Posts
    10,433
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian GC View Post
    Not so! There is nothing wrong with leaving an infant in a car with a parent. It could have been asleep, it could be a screamer, and you're toting less people into the waiting room.

    If the kid was in the waiting room crying for twenty minutes Hearth would have been complaining about why she didn't leave the kid in the car. Maybe he would have called free 911 "on the spot" for disturbing the peace.
    The way it was written, I just assumed the infant was alone and it never crossed my mind there may be a someone with the infant.

    "I have an infant in the car. You can't get me in any sooner?" and the receptionist says "No" and the woman walks out the door. Mind you it's 85* and not a cloud in the sky today.

    A clever observation on your part, I simply missed that point.
    Last edited by Tool-Slinger; 07-12-2013 at 08:59 PM. Reason: thesarsuras
    "You boys are really making this thing harder than it has to be". Me

    "Who ARE you people? And WHAT are you doing in my SWAMP!?" Shrek

    Service calls submitted after 3PM will be posted the next business day.

    I give free estimates [Wild Ass Guesses] over the phone.

    "I am sorry for interrupting, please continue with your quarreling" Some chick on TV

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,277
    I want to sincerely apologize to Brian personally and to the ARP as a whole for my post when I unloaded on Brian. While I strongly disagree with his posts, I let my passions and personal convictions and experience overwhelm me and a lot of feelings apparently just burst out. It was like an out of body experience. Right after I posted it, I wrote to Dad a confession and upon reflection, I felt I needed to address not only Brian but the group as a whole. The very nature of the ARP is a volatile, argumentative forum and we all need to force ourselves not to let happen to them what happened to me today. I am usually able to curb my emotions but something got loose on this one but that is no excuse. As Dad told me, he, too sometimes has to just step away and cool off. Wise words to live by. Anyway, sorry for the buzz kill.

    Going forward, I have a lot of personal matters to attend to so I won't be around the ARP much for a bit. I just got home from the emergency room with my daughter plus I have a ton of work piling up that's more important than playing on the ARP so I'm going to drift away for awhile. So, ya'll be good and Brian, I do pray you forgive me for my unkind words and forgive my impertinence.

    Warmest regards,
    Hearthman

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