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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,263
    First of all the last guy may have fixed the problem at hand. Did you ask your customer what was done ? Have you never repaired a unit only to be called back for something else that went wrong ? I would bet that all Craigslist ad guys are not hacks. Could be a journeymen doing side jobs. Do you work for yourself ? If so, believe me you will gain more customers by saving them money verses changing equipment. Yes, replacing equipment is sometimes the better choice but with the little details you gave here

    P.S. I know it sounds like everyone is beating you up but don't think we don't like your attitude to DO THINGS RIGHT !
    Last edited by VTP99; 06-27-2013 at 09:00 AM.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Hebderson Ky
    Posts
    55
    IMO. I would give the customer price of repair and replace. It's the customers money and its there decision to spend it not mine. Personally I would repair over replace considering that the older units actually last longer than the equipment we are getting out of Mexico these days.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by Hwolfe View Post
    IMO. I would give the customer price of repair and replace. It's the customers money and its there decision to spend it not mine. Personally I would repair over replace considering that the older units actually last longer than the equipment we are getting out of Mexico these days.
    Agree.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,879
    Quote Originally Posted by Hwolfe View Post
    IMO. I would give the customer price of repair and replace. It's the customers money and its there decision to spend it not mine. Personally I would repair over replace considering that the older units actually last longer than the equipment we are getting out of Mexico these days.
    Yep, and when they do need a new unit! They'll call you instead of the (salesman) guy! But, i do agree with the OP to a point! Lot's of unknowns. Maybe even low on 22. Personally i would of replaced the run cap and totally did away with the (PTC) hard start and got it running and then checked the refrigerant levels and went from there! Instead he saw it as an easy sale! And yes, i've seen this same issue (blown PTC) several times and everytime they fire right up after you replace a few spade connectors and strip back some burnt wiring. And if you want? You can clean the soot off the PCB with some isoporyl alcohol and a Q-tip! It's the right thing to do!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164
    I would have repaired that

    I dont put a new cond unit on a R-22 system unless absolutely needed ... the indoor units days are numbered

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,879
    Haha,
    I happened to run across the same unit today! You can see the blue factory PTC in the pic!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    91
    Wow! That is not what I expected! Hmm...so that's what it's SUPPOSED to look like! Lol

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,879
    Quote Originally Posted by nolaHVAC View Post
    Wow! That is not what I expected! Hmm...so that's what it's SUPPOSED to look like! Lol
    Yep, that's how it came from the factory! Also, Did you sell the guy just a condensor or a whole system?

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    119
    capacitor-50
    ptc-50
    contactor-50
    defrost board-200
    few wires and terminals-25
    labor-1.5 hrs@575

    yeah, better let er go, its whats best.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    In a house with windows and doors on it.
    Posts
    114
    I agree that it was the PTC that burned up. It's rare but it DOES happen. I would blame foreign parts.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,348
    Any tech right out of school could fix it quickly by just holding up the new parts next to the old and cutting back/cleaning a few wires. I'm sure the OP is more than competant enough to quickly and cleanly accomplish it. There is nothing particularly heroic about this repair. There is, however, a potential element of stupidity depending on who you work for...

    For those of you who could complete the repair for a reasonable amount: Good for you; and by all means offer it. For the rest of us whose companies would charge a pretty significant amount to fix the immediate issues; it is completely valid to offer an entire replacement system (furnace as well). It's a little young, granted; but that's really not your call. Present all options and let the customer decide what's in their best interest.

    Some of you would appear to allow some exaggerated and baseless (in this specific instance) sense of pride dictate what needs to be done. With the new furnace requirements coming at some point and the price of 22 - you could very well lose a future install as the customer will be upset with you for not explaining all options. And with a 17 year old system the odds are greater that something else will fail than they are in favor of repair-free operation till end of life. I always cringe when I get called out to an older system and notice a new board or blower motor was just put on within the last year. Now what's wrong and how much am I going to have to hit them with?

    Again - if you could remedy this situation cheaply; then we're not even having this discussion. However if you work for a major contractor that's charging what all the other major contractors with unending and ever increasing overhead are charging: You'll want to remember it's the customers money and interests that should dictate the proper action - not your skill level or sense of satisfaction.

    If you are completely above board in all your communication and let the customer decide, you can never be wrong.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,879
    Sad thing is the new systems break too! Most likely sooner than their old!

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,348
    Sadly true indeed; nothing is built the way it used to be.

    But hopefully the labor charges for warrantied parts ten years down the road will still be far less than limping an old system along with new motors, boards and gas valves...Not to mention r22.

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