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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Too bad tha block isn't inside the insulated space of the home so you gain that thermal mass. I personally would have put insulation on the exterior of the block, then the stucco. But getting wire mesh attached to the block kthrough foam board to hold the stucco is tricky. Then just leave an air gap and then drywall. But this isn't a common construction method.

    Honestly, given the wall construction, I'm a little confused as to why your having issues. On paper, I would think that would be plenty of cooling if not oversized.

    You might want to look at a getting someone in with a IR camera to verify the wall insulation and compare different parts of the home. Basically an energy audit.

    Another question... do you have one of thsoe GIANT vent hoods in the kitchen that are popular now? When running, those can add over 2 tons of cooling capacity on a 90F humid day. However, your system should have caught up overnight.

    I've been looking for someone local to do an energy audit since I was advised to do so a couple of weeks back. Unfortunately I've had no luck. We do have a very large vent system over the range but it has not been in use during the past week when temperature issues became more apparent.

    Today we had the system running at a lower setting (75) since the early morning. The inside temperature dropped to the 75-76 range while outside temps remained at 98-99. My wife cooked a bit, TV on, doors open with kids coming in and out and the temp remained in the same range. Can the difference be the system was removing more humidity yesterday because the overnight setting was higher?

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,754
    Quote Originally Posted by BAVE View Post
    When the house was designed we specified the equipment to be housed inside the home (not attic space). Each unit has a closet. The doors were fitted with 25x30 wood louvered grilles that were built with more spacing than traditional metal grilles. However, the large room does not have a return in it (as mentioned previously it is around the corner in the hallway).

    post a picture of the return grill and the unit sitting in the closet.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,323
    Quote Originally Posted by timjimbob View Post
    Remember,high ceiling do not require more AC. It is the sq. ft. of the walls and roof, not the volume.
    THAAT'S DOUBLE-SPEAK, if I've ever heard it!!

    x
    c
    v
    b
    MORE VOLUME = MORE AREA
    or
    is
    it
    MORE AREA = MORE VOLUME
    Q
    W
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    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by t527ed View Post
    post a picture of the return grill and the unit sitting in the closet.
    unit & zone equip


  5. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    39
    BTW, I have no idea what the additional ductwork on the side is but Im assuming it is related to the zoning of the theater room as it was added at that time and not present with other units.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,358
    Quote Originally Posted by dan sw fl View Post
    THAAT'S DOUBLE-SPEAK, if I've ever heard it!!

    x
    c
    v
    b
    MORE VOLUME = MORE AREA
    or
    is
    it
    MORE AREA = MORE VOLUME
    Q
    W
    E
    R
    T
    Y
    Yep. Let's take a square slab of concrete on the ground, say 50 x 50, which makes for 2,500 square feet, not an uncommon size for RNC today. Run up the walls evenly to nine feet, and slap a roof on. Now we have 25,000 cubic feet.

    But now let's run up the walls to the OP's height of 26 feet. That's now 65,000 cubic feet.

    Let's take one wall of the lower height building and find its surface area: 450 square feet. Let's expose it to a temperature difference of 25 degrees between interior and exterior. 100 degrees outside, 75 degrees inside. No windows or doors. No sun beating on this wall...just a simple air temperature difference. Let's also give it a consistent R value of 19 (no thermal bridging or framing factor to worry about here). Total heat gain for this wall: 592 BTU.

    Now run it on up to 26 feet, other parameters unchanged: 1,250 square feet at 1,645 BTU. Yikes.

    But...but...we don't have to cool all that air...just the air in the occupied zone...right? So...you want to purposely trap a lot of air that you can't adequately condition for moisture, dust control, etc.?
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,231
    and what type of insulation did you say you have in the
    attic?

    what types of windows? solar heat gain & ufactor numbers?
    low e...argon? what types of frames?

    for an energy rater visit www.resnet.org
    quite a few in texas.

    best of luck.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

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