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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    ???

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    So they came today and did everything in under 4 hours. Fired her up and the pressures weren't right. He took the cover off and it was icing up after the drier inside the unit. They never replaced it with a straight pipe. Owner called and I told him that he knew that pipe was getting cold and we talked about how it was probably a restriction in the skinny line from the compressor coming apart. He said he couldn't tell because he never was able to run the system. Sounds like a cop out to me since the first thing you guys said was that. I asked him if he could at least charge half time tomorrow and he kind of half heartedly stubbornly agreed. I don't know, seems like a mess up on their part. What do you guys think?

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    nw ohio
    Posts
    171
    just curious.

    what do you do for a living?
    compressors never die; they're always murdered!

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    Me? Teacher. Why?

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    nw ohio
    Posts
    171
    just curious.

    the system is under five years old?
    did the installing contractor look at your problem?
    I would think the compressor would have a five-year limited warranty from the original installation.
    compressors never die; they're always murdered!

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    Compressor is free, I'm just paying labor and other parts, refrigerant, etc. Which is still very expensive. Adding another two hours plus on top of everything isn't going to help.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,086
    Quote Originally Posted by cano View Post
    So they came today and did everything in under 4 hours. Fired her up and the pressures weren't right. He took the cover off and it was icing up after the drier inside the unit. They never replaced it with a straight pipe. Owner called and I told him that he knew that pipe was getting cold and we talked about how it was probably a restriction in the skinny line from the compressor coming apart. He said he couldn't tell because he never was able to run the system. Sounds like a cop out to me since the first thing you guys said was that. I asked him if he could at least charge half time tomorrow and he kind of half heartedly stubbornly agreed. I don't know, seems like a mess up on their part. What do you guys think?
    Were I doing the work I would have removed the drier inside the unit after that amount of work, even if the drier inside the unit was fine. A system only needs one drier, so if the system was opened up for repairs I would have removed the original drier and installed a new one on the liquid line outside the unit. That's just good practice.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    He said it only acts like a strainer and he's never had to remove one before. I know he's bs'ing me now. Let's see what he says tomorrow.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    I have a question about these isolation valves. Do they change how much work has to be done now? I assume they isolate the compressor or the whole out side unit for servicing. Does that make it easier or less work to replace the liquid line drier on the inside of the unit?

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    20,261
    We call them service valves. In a nutshell; they isolate the outdoor unit from the lineset and indoor coil. One can 'pump down' most of the refrigerant into the outdoor unit, close the valves, recover the rest of the refrigerant, and then work on the lines and coil... which would include an inline filter-dryer. One must always do a pressure test and a thorough vacuum of whatever has been opened, or one is asking for problems down the road.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Galatians 2:20-21; Colossians 1: 21-22 & 26-27; 3:1-4; Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    5,821
    Id drop this guy. I cant believe what I'm reading.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    46
    Well, might as well let them finish at this point. They're here now. It's been almost two hours. Half hour of that was the tech waiting in his van for the owner to come. Not using them again, that's for sure. The straight pipe to delete the drier was just put on now.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,425
    Quote Originally Posted by Shophound View Post
    Were I doing the work I would have removed the drier inside the unit after that amount of work, even if the drier inside the unit was fine. A system only needs one drier, so if the system was opened up for repairs I would have removed the original drier and installed a new one on the liquid line outside the unit. That's just good practice.

    Sometimes it's a major pain to do, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

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