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  1. #1

    New member interested in becoming a HVAC Tech. Questions?

    Hello everyone, I came across your forum while doing a Google search for learning HVAC.

    A little background about myself. I was employed in the manufacturing field for almost 20 years. Worked my way up to becoming the Supervisor. But like everywhere else the economy took a hit and I'm now unemployed. I have decided to take the opportunity to go back to school and take some training at age 45

    I'm very interested in this field and I am researching schools and such now. Unfortunately we have no trade schools around me that I am aware of that offer this training. It was suggested to take an online course for HVAC but this does not seem very practical to me. I would think one would need hands on training.

    1) My question is what would members suggest for someone in my situation for training in this field?

    2) Is an online course worth even spending the money on without hands on training?

    3) Is this field something you would suggest for a person of my age starting out?

    4) Does anyone know of any training around Binghamton, NY

    Thanks for any help or insight. I look forward to hearing suggestions from the pros on the forum. I'm off to read more of the forum.

    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Stumptown,USA
    Posts
    1,251
    Dave, welcome to Hvac-talk.com. Trade school or Community college is always a Plus. I am on the west coast so I can only speak for how it works out here. We have both Union and non union programs near Portland,Oregon. It is easier to get hired to a non union shop if you have limited experience/schooling. My advice to you is to go to the local supply houses and ask about RSES meetings if there is a local chapter. You can also find out which union is your local. Also ask if Associated Builders and Contractors has a local program. you can google ABC and UA (united association) and check out their websites. I would suggest you go with commercial HVAC at your age. I switched to commercial when I was 44 and now I am 59 and am making good money. Hopefully one of our East Coast techs will respond and give you more tips. If there is an ABC program you can have your name put on the apprentice waiting list and maybe get hired that way.
    Challenge yourself, take the CM test --- Certificate Member since 2004 ---Join RSES ---the HVAC/R training authority ---www.rses.org

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    21
    Welcome Sharkz! In my honest opinion, I'm not quite sure how many major supply houses are up there, but it might be worth the risk in reaching out to a company local and inquiring the information from them. It's never to late to learn, but in the Binghamton/Johnson City there's not as much refrigeration; apposed to where I am [NYC]. They might be open to bringing in some mature green hands to learn. A/C is pretty easy, in my opinion and easier to pick up. Start with PM's [maintenance] and work your way up to builds.

  4. #4
    Paul thanks for the suggestions. I did Google the 2 programs you suggestions, Unfortunately ABC is an hour plus away. But I will take your other suggestions and contact the supply houses tomorrow. Maybe that's why our area is booming with opportunities for this field. Nothing around here for training. Or I'm looking in the wrong places which is quite possible. Neither of the colleges here offer this course unfortunately.

    I will continue my search and post an update tomorrow. Off to read and research more.

  5. #5
    RJudge almost of the ads local here are asking for experience but if the company's are desperate you never know without asking right?

    Another question, when you guys say "supply houses" that just means local HVAC companies correct?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkz View Post
    RJudge almost of the ads local here are asking for experience but if the company's are desperate you never know without asking right?

    Another question, when you guys say "supply houses" that just means local HVAC companies correct?
    It never hurts to ask. Sometimes the effort and willingness to learn and work is better fan experience.

    And by Supply house we mean; A place where you would pick up parts, tools, chemicals, etc... Like here in NYC you've got ABCO, Johnstone Supply, United Refrigeration... It's a parts store. Like your local Autozone, but larger warehouses.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Stumptown,USA
    Posts
    1,251
    www.training.carrier.com click on training materials I suggest GTAC 1 and 2 stands for General Training Air Conditioning. This training program is in powerpoint format.
    Challenge yourself, take the CM test --- Certificate Member since 2004 ---Join RSES ---the HVAC/R training authority ---www.rses.org

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    SE Nebraska
    Posts
    227
    Yep, agree with getting hired on as a filter changer/coil cleaner. Ask as much questions as you can to acquire some knowledge. Mechanical aptitude is a huge plus

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    11
    Check craigslist for someone looking to hire a glorified "hand me this tool" person and learn as much as you can. Check with the major suppliers in your area as many of them (at least in my area) offer small classes right inside their warehouse. Many employers will even pay for this for a person that they see as a go getter and who shows an interest to learn. You can find many workbooks online that will give you enough knowledge to get certified. Then the learning really begins.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake Ronkonkoma, New York
    Posts
    532
    Sorry to say that there really are no HVAC schools in your area. The closest I found where Mohawk Valley Community College in Rome which is about 120 miles from you and the Fortis Institute in the Wilks Barrie, Pa area. this school is around 80 miles away from Binghamton.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    989
    or Sell if you are comfortable
    --warming up;
    --with a Co history;
    --Why you work for "that" Co;
    --Let's measure it up (the need) together with the client;
    -- Let's compare the value(s);
    -- What'ya like best? Least?
    --So your questions are (rephrasing without presuming even waht the Q's may mean, for clarity);
    --Clients Peace of Mind;
    --then some benefits/advantages/yourself-with-the-System;
    --and close for :
    TODAY,
    IMPENDING EVENT;
    on decent superior package your expertise and OEM and "that" Company has offered!

    If that can fit while staying technical, good money can be residential to industrial agreements and closures.

    note:
    over 55% of the residential selling Systems is completed in
    one first call.

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