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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,487
    I won't know what they will go for until I ask them. My preference would be to bolt the prep table in place and remote a 1/2HP condenser for it.

    That is a funny idea - just graft on a second condenser coil. But what would happen? Say we could cut the TD in half - so if the space temp was 85 then we could maybe run a 115 condensing temperature? Would I have to replace the condenser fan too?

    PHM
    -------



    Quote Originally Posted by Snapperhead View Post
    so I guess you're going with the 1/2 hp condensing unit ?

    would the customer go for this ?

    How about just adding a second coil to remove some of that heat .... double row coil ??
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,621
    Get creative and piggyback a water cooled condenser.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,487
    I love that idea!

    I had to do a bunch of end-of-the-year billing today and didn't get back to the place yet but I'll see what they want to do. They just bought the place and opened a week ago today so I'm not sure how kicking out large dollars will fly for them. I doubt that the price of a water valve and a condenser and all the piping will thrill them though. <g>

    PHM

    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    Get creative and piggyback a water cooled condenser.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    247
    Id remote the condenser personally and skip the water cooled... Seems like these days we're all about conserving water, especially here in the Midwest, having a case go through all that water just going down the drain just don't seem right. I don't know about the environment its in, but the pizza kitchens ive been in have been high flour environments that basically required all the indoor refer condensers being cleaned weekly, which is why I vote for the remote...

    There is the other option, get it running, sell it as is, and buy a different brand!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Flat Rock, NC
    Posts
    463
    I have also installed cpr valves to prevent overloading compressor when they turn on the rail. Some units I service use low temp rated compressor and really needed that addition. One system went from 1 comp. per year to currently running the same comp. for 8 yrs. with no other changes to the unit design.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    673
    PHM, that is freaking awesome and hilarious that you posted that conversation!

    I have had a similar conversation with another manufacturer Randell.

    Working on a three-door pizza prep table with cold rail, that used a 1/2hp cond. unit. Kitchen was at 85*f on the dot. Unit just wouldn't keep up, factory had us change compressor, TXV's, etc., etc. After still having issues, finally tech support says, "Well, we say they're rated to work in up to 86*f ambient, but we actually only test them at 75*f ambient." Wow! Condensing units de-rate as the ambient temperatures increase. Just last week, I was asked to work on a 6-drawer Randell equipment-stand lowboy cooler underneath a grill that was staying right around 45*f through the day. I saw the box pull down to 33*f when all the drawers were shut, but it took a LONG time to pull down. Two evaporator coils, all fans working, even frost patterns on both coils. I look over to the GIANT mechanical area for the condensing unit. Think to myself, wow, must be a big condensing unit. Remove the grill, and its all empty space, except for the wee little 1/3hp condensing unit sitting there struggling and fighting for its life in a 85*f kitchen. What a joke. Called factory and they said try changing the drawer gaskets if they're torn. Really? You think that's the problem? They said other than that, the customers just need to stop opening the drawers so much. Nice. Tech support also told me that unit already has had compressor replaced just about a year ago, and thermostats replaced too. I casually mentioned to the customer that the only real solution is to upgrade the condensing unit. But since the refrigerator is only 3 years old and still has compressor warranty, of course they don't want to do that. Ok, sign here, collect money, bye bye!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,487

    ! was just amazed by the tech support call -

    Normally tech support line people are very good and most are truly excellent. It is generally a pleasure for me to talk to someone who speaks refrigeration language well And really knows their own equipment. Although sometimes I do try to get engineering on the phone. <g>

    But the Continental guy was absolutely astonishing to me. Although he was very pleasant and nice to talk to - he seemed as though he pretty much knew nothing technical about the machines they sold or even about refrigeration in general. I was picturing how it would be if I were say; a second year apprentice - calling in for help and getting This friggin guy. Holy Dog Poop Batman! <g>

    PHM
    -------




    Quote Originally Posted by trippintl0 View Post
    PHM, that is freaking awesome and hilarious that you posted that conversation!

    I have had a similar conversation with another manufacturer Randell.

    Working on a three-door pizza prep table with cold rail, that used a 1/2hp cond. unit. Kitchen was at 85*f on the dot. Unit just wouldn't keep up, factory had us change compressor, TXV's, etc., etc. After still having issues, finally tech support says, "Well, we say they're rated to work in up to 86*f ambient, but we actually only test them at 75*f ambient." Wow! Condensing units de-rate as the ambient temperatures increase. Just last week, I was asked to work on a 6-drawer Randell equipment-stand lowboy cooler underneath a grill that was staying right around 45*f through the day. I saw the box pull down to 33*f when all the drawers were shut, but it took a LONG time to pull down. Two evaporator coils, all fans working, even frost patterns on both coils. I look over to the GIANT mechanical area for the condensing unit. Think to myself, wow, must be a big condensing unit. Remove the grill, and its all empty space, except for the wee little 1/3hp condensing unit sitting there struggling and fighting for its life in a 85*f kitchen. What a joke. Called factory and they said try changing the drawer gaskets if they're torn. Really? You think that's the problem? They said other than that, the customers just need to stop opening the drawers so much. Nice. Tech support also told me that unit already has had compressor replaced just about a year ago, and thermostats replaced too. I casually mentioned to the customer that the only real solution is to upgrade the condensing unit. But since the refrigerator is only 3 years old and still has compressor warranty, of course they don't want to do that. Ok, sign here, collect money, bye bye!
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,179
    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post

    That is a funny idea - just graft on a second condenser coil. But what would happen? Say we could cut the TD in half - so if the space temp was 85 then we could maybe run a 115 condensing temperature? Would I have to replace the condenser fan too?

    PHM
    -------
    No joking , go out into the shed , find a used cond , splice off the outlet with a little tubing , zip tie them bad boys together , make your own casing/shroud with cardboard just for testing purposes, give her a little shot of juice , badda bing .

    If the thing actually works , have the tin man make you a nice casing for a shroud.

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