Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Post Sizing heating system for intermittent heating

    Hello,
    I am working for a municipality in British Columbia, Canada and we keep the building mostly at 10 degrees celsius (50 F), during most of the winter. I am looking at the possibility of installing a biomass boiler. However there are occasional times when the heat is turned up to 68 F. I am wondering would it be appropriated to design the system (including a propane peaking system) to meet the peak heat loss at 68 degrees or do I need to use an additional factor to account for heating the thermal mass of the building. The building is wood framed.

    Thank You.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by thomascheney View Post
    Hello,
    I am working for a municipality in British Columbia, Canada and we keep the building mostly at 10 degrees celsius (50 F), during most of the winter. I am looking at the possibility of installing a biomass boiler. However there are occasional times when the heat is turned up to 68 F. I am wondering would it be appropriated to design the system (including a propane peaking system) to meet the peak heat loss at 68 degrees or do I need to use an additional factor to account for heating the thermal mass of the building. The building is wood framed.

    Thank You.
    Wood framing is a usually low mass structure (not like stone, concrete, compacted earth, or brick) unless you're talking logs, but logs also have insulating value, so they are a bit of a different animal. If you are talking stick framed wood, then I don't think there will be much inertial lag there.

    Even though you will have a propane peaking system, consider adding a buffer tank to even out load fluctuations, absorb any residual heat from the biomass boiler, and to help you achieve the higher 68 deg temperature goal more quickly even using a boiler just sized for the heat loss at 68.

  3. #3
    Thank you, your advice is appreciated. I am thinking 5 gallons per 1000 btu for storage.

    Quote Originally Posted by vangoghsear View Post
    Wood framing is a usually low mass structure (not like stone, concrete, compacted earth, or brick) unless you're talking logs, but logs also have insulating value, so they are a bit of a different animal. If you are talking stick framed wood, then I don't think there will be much inertial lag there.

    Even though you will have a propane peaking system, consider adding a buffer tank to even out load fluctuations, absorb any residual heat from the biomass boiler, and to help you achieve the higher 68 deg temperature goal more quickly even using a boiler just sized for the heat loss at 68.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by thomascheney View Post
    Thank you, your advice is appreciated. I am thinking 5 gallons per 1000 btu for storage.
    That should be good. What is your system capacity?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by vangoghsear View Post
    That should be good. What is your system capacity?

    There 4 propane furnaces 2 for sure are 125,000 btu\hr and the others look like they are the same size

    The are three zones - one area served by two furnaces, and 2 served by 125,000 unit each

    Thanks!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event