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Thread: resi to comm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    5

    resi to comm

    hey gang new member here! just found this site and had to join,
    ive been in the resi feild here in MN for 17 years and in two weeks (notice) im jumpin into the commercial end , now the only commercial expierience iv had is combo roof tops. what do you guys think of this move im about to make?
    thought id add i do retro and never have done new home!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,370
    Light commercial or higher tonnage (chillers)? Either way, if you have a good understanding of all aspects of residential work - refrigeration, electrical, air distribution, etc. you have a decent launch point for going commercial. It's the same principles, just has various states of complexity. This will be the majority of your new learning curve...understanding the greater complexity of what's out there.

    I'm in the high tonnage end of commercial/institutional, but I still see parallels to what I learned as a residential/light commercial tech. If you like to study to understand more complex systems, you'll do fine.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    338
    there's alot of big stuff out there that can be intimidating.
    the basic refrigeration cycle still applies,there's just alot more bells and whistles.once you start learning bigger and better things,resi will be a distant memory.
    good luck

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,124

    No offense, but why wait so long?

    It seems to me like anyone who sticks with this line of work for a bit of time ends up on the commercial/industrial side. Most of the guys I know who did residential at any time usually only did for a few years here and there. I'm just curious what could keep someone in attics for 17 years. Again, no offense meant.

    On the other hand, I think you're probably a very capable and competent technician (otherwise you wouldn't have been employed for so long ), so the transition will be painless. All of the same principles apply like the other guys said, just on a bigger scale.

    I think you might eventually be asking yourself the same question I posed in the title of this post.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    30
    comm, resi...service is still the same.....my old super always said, service is 10% knowing it and 90% selling the customer on that you know it. Schematics and ref. cycle are still the same. Once comm. you'll never want to go back to attics.
    If Snickers is 'totally satisfying,' then why is there a King Size?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    5
    its basements here lol not too many attic jobs
    stayed in resi cuz i get paid just shy of comm pay and i can do resi work in my sleep and while ive had a couple, its just become kinda hum drum i guess, kind of stale and i want to keep challenging myself.
    beside knowledge is power right!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    NE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    39
    I did the switch about 10 years ago and I'd probably not go back unless I had too. There's just so many interesting things to work on the comm/ind side. Unstead of knocking on people's doors, you'll be signing in at guard shacks from now on....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    tri state
    Posts
    296
    I've done industrial ammonia r-717 for about 5 years and have RETA-CER.
    got the call from this sevice company for commercial work.Boss told me if i could do the industrial (ammonia) I could do this job.offer $$$ couldnt turn down.
    my transfer to commercial was very easy for me the only thing i had problems with is pressure and oil flow. with 3 days of training I was on my way as a out of state field tech.been with the company for over a year now and love it I travel more then work,lol.
    life is at its best when u learn something new.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ventura, CA
    Posts
    17

    Just did the same..

    Shawn,
    I know the wonder/worry you're feeling. After 15 years doing Resi and light commercial I made the switch to full commercial and Industrial about two months ago. The good news is what you know doesn't change only how it is applied. So far all the guys I have worked with were more than willing to explain and guide me in the right direction. Don't lie about what you know, ask questions, take notes and read about what you learn at night. You'll never want to knock on another resi door again.
    It's not just a job, it's an adventure...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793

    get ready to buy tools

    ....lots of tools, comm requires more

    best of luck

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Western, NY
    Posts
    817
    Commercial has much more variety of equipment. Something new to do every day. Good luck. Start saving now for all the additional tools you will be needing to buy.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Tx.
    Posts
    575
    Quote Originally Posted by dad9299 View Post
    comm, resi...service is still the same.....my old super always said, service is 10% knowing it and 90% selling the customer on that you know it. Schematics and ref. cycle are still the same. Once comm. you'll never want to go back to attics.
    i disagree. the differences between commercial and residential service are many. not only is the equipment different (not necessarily more complex anymore with the changes in residential equipment), but the customers are very different. your interaction with your commercial customers had better be different than it is with a residential customer or you will quickly return to the attic.
    mike

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    11
    Guess the only thing I could give you here is, do not forget the basic's and do not let is overwhelm you just remember get as much training as you can and always remember you are just moving heat from on place to another.

    Train Train Train whether by you employer or out of your own pocket you will never loose the training no matter who you work for !

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