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  1. #1

    Question Duct Cleaning Advice

    Hello, great forum you have here!

    Ok I will get right to the point. I am looking to have my ducts cleaned, but have become confused after researching on this forum.

    The facts:

    - I live in South Florida (Palm Beach Gardens)
    - 1500sqf Condominium on the second floor (of which there are three total floors)
    - Condominium is about 10 years old
    - ducts are in the ceiling, I believe they are flex ducts
    - 12 vents
    - Filter: Filtrite 2200 20x20" http://www.amazon.com/Filtrete-Aller.../dp/B002WC83DK

    - Looking to increase air quality; limit dust.

    I am almost certain the people who lived here before me have never vacuumed, they were slobs. I had the carpets cleaned before I moved in. I have a hoover vacuum with a HEPA filter; this one http://hoover.com/products/details/u...gless-upright/

    I have read many posts that say duct cleaning causes more harm than good. Have also read duct cleaning is not advised for flex ducts. On the contrary I have also read posts that state duct cleaning can be helpful IF it is professionally done right and the whole living space is vacuumed and dusted well.

    My home seems abnormally dusty. I have vacuumed once a week since I have moved in (December 2011). I have slight allergies, but the thick layers of dust that pile up once a week are irritating me.

    I have taken off the screen of my vents and looked inside, they do seem to be holding dust but nothing extreme.

    I have called some places that have good online reviews, and so far one is quoting me $400 for use of their Rotobrush. The other is quoting $700 and I do not know what method/machine they use.

    May I get some professional advice on what to do?

    From my research I should either find a professional that uses an Abatement and Not a Rotobrush or I should clean my home diligently and change the filter often.

    Thank you for reading,

    Peter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    7,031
    When the supply ducts leak it causes your house to be under a negative pressure with reference to outside therefore any crack and crevice in the ceiling, wall, floor windows, doors ect will pull in insulation, rodent feces, pollen, dirt ect from the attic, crawlspace, inside walls ect. To remedy this the ducts need to be sealed and a small amount of FILTERED outdoor air brought in to make the structure a positive pressure with reference to outdoors and purge indoor pollutants. In your climate a small ducted whole house dehumidifier might be your best choice AFTER the ducts are sealed and possibly cleaned if bad enough (not likely dirty enough after only 10 years of service). If the ducts can't be accessed there is a process called aeroseal that can seal them through an aerosalized spray through the duct, this only works for small sized leaks, if there are large leakage points they will need to be accessed and sealed with paint on mastic and/or mastic tape. A home energy audit with a blower door and duct blaster test would be what is needed to determine where the leakage is THEN a game plan can be derived to fix the problems. Hope this helps, check out www.comfortinstitute.org and www.resnet.us

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    When the supply ducts leak it causes your house to be under a negative pressure with reference to outside therefore any crack and crevice in the ceiling, wall, floor windows, doors ect will pull in insulation, rodent feces, pollen, dirt ect from the attic, crawlspace, inside walls ect. To remedy this the ducts need to be sealed and a small amount of FILTERED outdoor air brought in to make the structure a positive pressure with reference to outdoors and purge indoor pollutants. In your climate a small ducted whole house dehumidifier might be your best choice AFTER the ducts are sealed and possibly cleaned if bad enough (not likely dirty enough after only 10 years of service). If the ducts can't be accessed there is a process called aeroseal that can seal them through an aerosalized spray through the duct, this only works for small sized leaks, if there are large leakage points they will need to be accessed and sealed with paint on mastic and/or mastic tape. A home energy audit with a blower door and duct blaster test would be what is needed to determine where the leakage is THEN a game plan can be derived to fix the problems. Hope this helps, check out www.comfortinstitute.org and www.resnet.us
    I learned a lot from your post, thanks.

    How would I go about bringing in filtered outdoor air? I mean, is there a certain machine or something I use? (I'm new to all this) I'll do a search and see what I can learn.

    I looked into my ducts and there is some dirt/dust, but nothing extreme compared to other pictures I have seen. Therefore, I have decided duct cleaning is not needed.

    I don't believe there is a way to access the ducts, so thank you for mentioning the Aeroseal.

    Great information. Thank you.

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