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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Water drop a cross coil

    I have thre AHU's too are York late 80's and the othe is abou a ten year Trane prolly can get some coil info for thet on. But not likely on the York is there a rule of thumb what the pressure drop needs to be thanks for any help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Mixing oil and fire with a big spoon.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyr325 View Post
    ... is there a rule of thumb what the pressure drop needs to be thanks for any help
    assuming that i know what it is you are talking about (you might try using a comma or period every once in a while), every coil is going to have a different pressure drop that is dependant on coil design, fluid type and gpm.
    When I am late for work, I usually make up for it by leaving early.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    The Hot South
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    1,317
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyr325 View Post
    I have thre AHU's too are York late 80's and the othe is abou a ten year Trane prolly can get some coil info for thet on. But not likely on the York is there a rule of thumb what the pressure drop needs to be thanks for any help
    Why don't you try it again using spell check.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Dyersburg, TN
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    sorry about the post. It is hard to type on a phone. I have two york air handler on a chilled water loop. I am having a water flow problem and cannot narrow down the problem. Is there a normal pressure drop for cooling coils. I cannot get any data on the coil. It is a York CS113SHFCLP. I have 2 psi drop from the inlet to outlet. Any ideals?

  5. #5
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    Jan 2013
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    No one have any ideals

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    1,170
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyr325 View Post
    No one have any ideals
    I know you meant ideas. It would be just a guess on anyone's part. What is the delta T through the coil? I think trending the delta T might give you a little insight as to whether the flow is correct or not. Does the system have water treatment? Have you sampled it and had it tested? What if there is fouling in the system and the heat exchange through the coil is out of spec?

  7. #7
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    Jul 2007
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    I would check delta T across the air side and water side of the coil as a start.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Dixiana, AL
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    2,610
    I'd be posting some readings (accurate ones) from the coil and pump, and giving a little info on the system. You give little, you get little.

  9. #9
    Personally I would suggest you start by making sure your coils are clean on the outside and INSIDE. The basics are the basics. Compare the Delta T before and after .... I think it was Trane that put out a little article that said a 1/32 inch layer cuts the efficiency of a coil by 30%.

    There are some easy methods to clean the INSIDE of the coil ... cupric oxide is generally the starting problem and then it "catches" all the suspended materials floating in the systems. To many people just clean the outside and ignore the INSIDE. It is harder to do but if you know the tricks you can clean the inside without taking the system down, draining it and then having to rebalance or it being out of service.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.A. (upper Alabama)
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    861
    High delta T on water usually means low water flow,( possibly too much air across the coil, but highly doubt it). Check strainers. Low delta T on water usually means dirty filters, dirty coil, (too much water flow, but highly doubt it). You have to know what your design delta T is to start.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    East coast USA
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    972
    water temps, loop water pressures, GPM, air flows, dirty coils, filters, clogged or dirty strainers, pump impellers clogged, dirty water.

    need to get all that info..

    http://www.usacoil.com/newsletters/aug.pdf

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dyersburg, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by CooltowersFL View Post
    Personally I would suggest you start by making sure your coils are clean on the outside and INSIDE. The basics are the basics. Compare the Delta T before and after .... I think it was Trane that put out a little article that said a 1/32 inch layer cuts the efficiency of a coil by 30%.

    There are some easy methods to clean the INSIDE of the coil ... cupric oxide is generally the starting problem and then it "catches" all the suspended materials floating in the systems. To many people just clean the outside and ignore the INSIDE. It is harder to do but if you know the tricks you can clean the inside without taking the system down, draining it and then having to rebalance or it being out of service.
    What is the best way to clean the inside of coil?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Not in Iran
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    1,093
    If u can isolate the coil and circulate and acid or recommended chemical thru the coil for a period of time , with a personal portable pump, thus should do it., but before u do this , check all the other possible problems like what was mentioned., strainers . Water flow, belts , air flow, and what is the delta T? I may have missed it .
    But you do need to find the pressure drop for the gpm u have .

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