commercial install tech pay ? - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 33
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    But be honest is 13 an hour a livable wage?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,103
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert25 View Post
    But be honest is 13 an hour a livable wage?
    Since when is that the employer's problem? If someone wants to make more money, they must learn their trade and work harder and smarter.

    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    By his own admission, the OP is just starting, has not completed his degree yet, and is a helper.

    I'd have beat someone's a$$ to make $13/hour when I was just starting as a service helper who hadn't completed a training program.

    I think I started at minimum wage.

    It's called a training wage. Pay is commensurate with skill, knowledge and value to the company. As those qualities increase, pay should increase proportionally. If it doesn't, MOVE.

    Quite frankly, $13/hour sound reasonable to me for a newbie to start at providing for raises as skill increases.
    I was working the trade for 3-4 years before I made that much.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    Tech rob u sound like a capitalist

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    2,821
    I used to make $10 an hour and managed to keep my wife and two kids under a roof with food on the table. Didn't have cable, no Internet, didn't have a membership to anything, just rent and the bare necessities, I rode a bicycle to work, I would walk or ride to the store, even rode my bicycle 15-20 miles for other side work jobs when they came up. Heck before that which was when I was a resi installer I worked for a steel company at $8.50 an hour. Never complained about any of it, I was happy to have a job and to give my best everyday.

    Yes, you can live off $13 an hour maybe not the way you want to live so use it as motivation to get better, be hungry to be the best and change your life by both becoming great at something and getting paid for those skills.

    We Americans have become spoiled plain and simple, somehow we think it's a right to get paid a good wage, it's a privilege and it's earned not given. $13hr is great for someone who is more a liability than a benefit to a company, he's being PAID to learn, people intern for free all the time because they are getting experience and knowledge in return.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    Mason when was this 1920?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    Mason up north isn't as cheap as the south ok and if we work in the summer there's no guarantee there's going to be work in the winter u know the say "make A while the sunshine" that's how it is up north

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    121
    If you have so much objections feel free to start your own company. My current helper makes $12 a hour and is living off it just fine. I had to live off less than that 15 years ago. If you can't do it, then blame your own poor financial practices. Some people never seem to have enough money no matter how much they make. I knew a guy that made $22 a hour and kept going further and further in debt anyway.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    So Kobe is not what u make is what u save that's the rule you live by huh?

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    121
    No, it's not. They are both important. It's important to strive to become better and make more money through hard work, experience and skill. It's also important to spend your money wisely, and save it wisely.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    2,821
    I was making $8.50 an hour in Louisville, KY in 2006. Was making $15 an hour doing HVAC in Denver, CO in 2007(not a cheap place) I started making a fair bit more but then the economy tanked in '08, moved back to KY and started out making $10 an hour in 2009 because of strict licensing laws that put me as an installer for the first 2 years, 2011 I reached the max at my company of $16. Since 2006 I decided to try and be the best at something, you think about things like that when you're pulling 50-100tons of steel every night. I've put the time and effort in, still have a ways to go to be the best but now I'm with a good company doing more commercial and industrial work and they started me out at $24.73 plus benefits, it's union, with a plan to go up about every 6months if I can deliver with performance.

    I never complained or felt sorry for myself during any of this, I knew that to get to where I wanted to go I had to earn it, every penny with hard work. As for the time off, I've never had any time off, every company I've worked for has found something for me even when it's slow, sometimes that means I'm cleaning up the shop or servicing the shop units, I've run errands for the boss or helped in the office, maybe organized the parts area or the warehouse. The union company I'm with is about as non union as it gets, they bring in their own guys like me and then get them into the union, none of their full time guys have worked less than 32hours in a week for many years now and there's 12 of us, we have tons of maintenance contracts though so it carries us through the spring and fall.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by mason View Post
    I was making $8.50 an hour in Louisville, KY in 2006. Was making $15 an hour doing HVAC in Denver, CO in 2007(not a cheap place) I started making a fair bit more but then the economy tanked in '08, moved back to KY and started out making $10 an hour in 2009 because of strict licensing laws that put me as an installer for the first 2 years, 2011 I reached the max at my company of $16. Since 2006 I decided to try and be the best at something, you think about things like that when you're pulling 50-100tons of steel every night. I've put the time and effort in, still have a ways to go to be the best but now I'm with a good company doing more commercial and industrial work and they started me out at $24.73 plus benefits, it's union, with a plan to go up about every 6months if I can deliver with performance.

    I never complained or felt sorry for myself during any of this, I knew that to get to where I wanted to go I had to earn it, every penny with hard work. As for the time off, I've never had any time off, every company I've worked for has found something for me even when it's slow, sometimes that means I'm cleaning up the shop or servicing the shop units, I've run errands for the boss or helped in the office, maybe organized the parts area or the warehouse. The union company I'm with is about as non union as it gets, they bring in their own guys like me and then get them into the union, none of their full time guys have worked less than 32hours in a week for many years now and there's 12 of us, we have tons of maintenance contracts though so it carries us through the spring and fall.
    X2

    Well put, Mason. We are all responsible for our own financial gain. If you want more money, you have three choices:

    1) Prove to your boss you're worth more.
    2) Find a boss who will pay you what you're worth.
    3) Become the boss.

    I did #1, now I am #3, the boss.

    In all three choices, it depends on the individual to create their own path and success. No one owes you anything. If they are not giving you what you feel you deserve, find someone who will. If you can't find someone who will, maybe you don't deserve what you think you're worth! (General "you", not directed at Mason at all)

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Boston Massachusetts
    Posts
    46
    Mason atleast you have a network that you can move around and get opportunity to prove your self to climb up the ladder what about those who have the ability no opportunity no network and didn't get the opportunity to prove them self that's call suffocated one's talent

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    121
    I honestly don't know any instances short of living on a remote island with no internet (and since you live in Boston, that's clearly not the case here) where someone can't network.

    I network every time I'm at a supply house with other companies. I network every time I'm in a commercial job working with 10 other companies, HVAC or not. If I find a job that I'm too busy to do, or simply do not think it's worth my time to do, I pass it on to another company I've networked with and build business relations that way. I have good friends in at least 20 HVAC companies in the Bay Area. If your boss is giving you no opportunities, find someone who will give you an opportunity.

    There are opportunities everywhere, you just have to look.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event