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Thread: anticipators

  1. #1

    Confused anticipators

    hello:

    I have trouble picturing schematically how heat/cool anticipators work.

    I know heat turns of prematurely, cool turns on prematurely, but if the resistors are loads, how does their power get back to their source?

    don

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by theapprentice View Post
    hello:

    I have trouble picturing schematically how heat/cool anticipators work.

    I know heat turns of prematurely, cool turns on prematurely, but if the resistors are loads, how does their power get back to their source?

    don
    The heating anticipator is in series with the heating contacts in the thermostat, so is energized when the contacts are closed and the system switch is in the "heat" position.
    The cooling anticipator is in parallel with the cooling contacts in the thermostat, so is energized when the contacts are open and the system switch is in the "cool" position.
    Last edited by mark beiser; 03-12-2007 at 02:10 AM.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #3
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    Both of them are in series with the load.The heat anticipator stays in series on a call for heat.When you adjust the heat anticipator you are changing the wattage of the heater.The cooling anticipator stays in series all the time but is bypassed on a call for cooling.Remember that electricity will take the path of least resistance.So when the switch on a call for cooling is made the current will bypass or go around the resistor.The resistance of the cooling anticipator also keeps the cooling/fan contactors from pulling by voltage drop.
    Take your time & do it right!

  4. #4
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    Squish markwolf's and my answers together and you have the complete answer.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Squish markwolf's and my answers together and you have the complete answer.
    haha I like that......hmmmm I think we both goofed though.We should have specified when in heating/cooling mode in the description.
    Take your time & do it right!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwolf View Post
    haha I like that......hmmmm I think we both goofed though.We should have specified when in heating/cooling mode in the description.
    Nah, I was specific about the position of the system switch.

    My answer covered how the anticipators are wired in relation to the thermostat contacts, yours covered how they are wired in relation to the loads.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  7. #7
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    the apprentice

    The heat anticipators actually provide a little heat that can be felt by the sensing bulb.The heat anticipator is in series with the thermostat switch & the load, so it doesn't 'heat up' until the thermostat calls for heat. The 'heat' provided by the anticipator is then felt by the sensing bulb, which makes the bulb 'feel' a little warmer. This will make the sensing bulb 'think' that it has reached its setpoint before it actually does. So it will cut off aliitle early. Since it takes some additional time for the heater to cool down & the blower to stop, the anticipator keeps the temperature from 'overshooting' the setpoint.
    The cooling anticipator works the opposite. It is in parallel with the thermostat switch, and provides a little heat ( felt by the sensing bulb ) when the system is NOT calling for cooling. This 'fools' the bulb into thinking it is warmer than it actually is, which makes the switch close a little early, due to the fact that it takes a little time for the cooling system coil to get cold after it is turned on. Without the anticipator, the actual temp would get above setpoint before any actual cooling would have time to take place.

    I hope this helps,
    Richard

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