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Thread: Ribs this week

  1. #1
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    Ribs this week

    Doing ribs going to do St Louis ribs placing in saran wrap coating with them with pineapple juice and rub then tin foil cooking at 200 in oven for 3 hours then over to bbq removing all rap, and with mesquite chips with indirect heat for another 3 to 4 hours . coating with bbq sauce every 1/2 hour Anyone know another way or recipes

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    I like your idea of the pineapple juice and rub while wrapped in saran wrap in the fridge. However, smoking them after getting above 140 degrees doesn't really allow much absorption of the smoke into the meat. Remember that heat (and the smoke it carries) travels from hot to cold. Therefore, the best smoke penetration begins from when the meat is cold. So, I suggest doing the smoking part first and do that at a steady 225 degree cooking temperature. A proven cooking technique for smoked ribs is to use what is called the 3-2-1 method - each number representing a stage in your cooking process. Put the meat in your preheated smoker while at refrigerator temp, then smoke them for three hours (there's your "3" in 3-2-1). The ribs will be near 140 degrees by then. Their exterior will have dried up a bit and the meat will be showing signs of pulling away from the bone. Next, wrap tightly in foil, then continue to cook them at 225 for two hours (there's your "2" in 3-2-1). This stage can be done in the oven as well since you're not looking for any more smoke penetration into the meat. The foil "contains" the meat's moisture and fats to tenderize the otherwise sinewy texture of the meat. Next - remove the foil and put the ribs back into the 225 degree smoker (or oven) for one hour (there's your "1" in 3-2-1) to firm up the exterior some and give you that nice "bark" (a loose expression to describe the color and firmer texture of the meat's exterior - descriptively derived from tree "bark") . Lastly - remove from your heat source, transfer them onto a perforated broiler pan (to drain off drippings) and set that on the counter loosely cover with foil. Let them rest for a half hour or so. GEEZ! With all this said...I may smoke some ribs myself this holiday weekend. Have a good one yourself!

  3. #3
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    THAT SOUNDS AWSOME , IM COMMING OVER...WHERE DO YOU LIVE.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ECtofix View Post
    I like your idea of the pineapple juice and rub while wrapped in saran wrap in the fridge. However, smoking them after getting above 140 degrees doesn't really allow much absorption of the smoke into the meat. Remember that heat (and the smoke it carries) travels from hot to cold. Therefore, the best smoke penetration begins from when the meat is cold. So, I suggest doing the smoking part first and do that at a steady 225 degree cooking temperature. A proven cooking technique for smoked ribs is to use what is called the 3-2-1 method - each number representing a stage in your cooking process. Put the meat in your preheated smoker while at refrigerator temp, then smoke them for three hours (there's your "3" in 3-2-1). The ribs will be near 140 degrees by then. Their exterior will have dried up a bit and the meat will be showing signs of pulling away from the bone. Next, wrap tightly in foil, then continue to cook them at 225 for two hours (there's your "2" in 3-2-1). This stage can be done in the oven as well since you're not looking for any more smoke penetration into the meat. The foil "contains" the meat's moisture and fats to tenderize the otherwise sinewy texture of the meat. Next - remove the foil and put the ribs back into the 225 degree smoker (or oven) for one hour (there's your "1" in 3-2-1) to firm up the exterior some and give you that nice "bark" (a loose expression to describe the color and firmer texture of the meat's exterior - descriptively derived from tree "bark") . Lastly - remove from your heat source, transfer them onto a perforated broiler pan (to drain off drippings) and set that on the counter loosely cover with foil. Let them rest for a half hour or so. GEEZ! With all this said...I may smoke some ribs myself this holiday weekend. Have a good one yourself!

    Thanks you explained it very well. I now understand why my ribs are not as Smokey as I would like. They come out good just missing that smoke flavor

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Oklahoma
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    Getting ready to fire up the smoker for some ribs here today. 3-2-1 method!

  6. #6
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    Relatively new to smoking. Trying the 3-2-1 method this weekend. Do you have a preferred wood for ribs? I was thinking apple or cherry, but then thought hickory might give a stronger smoke flavor. Is smoky better than the faint sweetness from apple for ribs?
    A Veteran is a person, who at some point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to the United States of America for payment up to and including their life.
    Gene Castagnetti-Director of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    814
    Quote Originally Posted by doc havoc View Post
    Relatively new to smoking. Trying the 3-2-1 method this weekend. Do you have a preferred wood for ribs? I was thinking apple or cherry, but then thought hickory might give a stronger smoke flavor. Is smoky better than the faint sweetness from apple for ribs?
    I've never used cherry. Apple sounds good for ribs though. For me personally, I've stayed with the flavors from what I got from the deadfall of trees when I was growing up in Texas. I LOVE mesquite for steaks and chicken, but is a bit overpowering for brisket. Brisket gets to ride in the smoker with ribs or Boston butt with some hickory or oak. I'll switch up and use pecan occasionally for beef or pork.

    I used to just use hickory for ribs but sometimes mix it with oak now. If I used apple, I'd usually mix it in with oak so I get a hint of apple. I used just apple once, but seemed to be missing something once I dished up the meat.

    Here's a short guide for woods from a forum I visit occasionally. Lots of good info at that forum:

    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/g...-to-smoke-food

  8. #8
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    What a Great explaination how to cook Ribs, Going to give 3 2 1 a try.... Thanks
    It's All about Heat.............................to a degree

  9. #9
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    Apr 2004
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    Thanks ECto-I ended up using hickory and oak. The ribs turned out awesome! Just need to tweak my rub a bit. It isn't bad, it's just not fantastic.
    A Veteran is a person, who at some point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to the United States of America for payment up to and including their life.
    Gene Castagnetti-Director of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii

  10. #10
    I really like cooking ribs Ribs can be cooked differently. Ribs can be baby back ribs, spareribs, pulled pork and sometimes beef brisket. I commonly marinade my baby back ribs with barbecue sauce then grilled it For me, it is the best!

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