Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    76

    which insulation is the best sound barrier?

    I know this is a little off topic but for my new home I had a few areas, like bathrooms and master bedroom, that I wanted to give a little more sound privacy too. I know there are some good but pricey products on the market but I was wondering weather heating/cooling insulation would work too and which one is best from this use? I am planning on using spray foam for the exterior walls so I'm looking for a product to use in the interior walls

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,510
    they have a sound insulation with out a vapor bearier and works well to kepp noise out or in

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996

    If the walls are ready for drywall

    All the wiring and piping is done, just getting the guy to spray the interior walls (assuming one side is closed) would probably be the most cost effective
    to do since he's there anyway. The dense foam helps act as a solid 3" wall.
    Unfaced fiberglass is probably your next option.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    search acoustics --
    sound rooms, etc


    you need standoffs for the gyp -- which act as springs --

    stagger elec boxes so only one in same stud space as adjacent rm
    same for HVAC takeoffs = stagger
    put in jumper returns
    Styrofoam which is glued will help decouple sound path -- be sure to cover studs!

    polymer with lots of lead --

    Homasote
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Harrisburg Pa.
    Posts
    9

    Soundproof wall construction

    If this is not a load bearing wall then frame up 2 walls with 2"x3" studs (if it is then one of the walls must be 2"x4"). The overall dimension of the walls should be approx. 7 1/2" use seperate top and bottom plates for each wall. The studs must be layed out to fall on the center of the spaces in the adjacent wall (alternating do not line up the studs). Most sound transmission comes through the stud itself and this prevents the transmission from one side of the wall to the other.

    Insulate each stud space on each wall. The vapor barriers should be facing the outside of the wall.

    Also VERY important caulk the bottom plates to the floor. Have your drywaller install the drywall tight to the floor and caulk it too before the baseboards are installed. This caulking really helps alot. Try this... drive your car on the highway and don't quite have the window tight into the seal... its amazing how much the noise level decreases when you tighten the window for a firm seal. This is what the caulking does for you.

    Congratulations you have built a "soundproof" wall-

    Mark

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    BUT, the transmission thru the top & bottom plates is large!
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    76
    thanks guys, I have found some tape to apply to the both sides of studs/joist to break the drywall/subfloor form the studs/joist... then I also think I'm going to use a vinyl pad on top of the sub floor and cotton insulation under the subfoor and between the studs.

    thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Harrisburg Pa.
    Posts
    9

    Lightbulb

    Hi Cem-bsee:

    Thanks for reminding everyone to "use seperate top and bottom plates for each wall" as previously noted in my lengthy directions

    Always use seperate plates and remember they will be spaced about 2" apart if you use the over all dimension 7 1/2".
    2 3/4"(standard 2"x3" dimension) + 2 3/4" (standard 2"x3" dimension) = 5 1/2"

    7 1/2" (over all dimension) minus 5 1/2" equals a 2" isolation space between each top (and bottom) plate.

    my directions are only as good as the attention span of those readimg them!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    so, how are you going to actually fasten the gyp?
    if you use screws, you create a bridge for the sound to travel!

    be careful as to vapor barrier placement!
    in deep south, such goes on exterior side of wall!
    read at BUILDINGSCIENCE.com

    some have commented that the bubble padding for laminate flooring does well to block sound.

    the devil is in the details!
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    133
    Use fiberglass batts and laminate two layers of sheet rock with "Green Glue" between layers. Google "Green Glue". Tape on the studs does little. Calk the floor and ceiing joints with "Big Stretch" Calk.

    Frank

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    76
    Cem,
    yes I was going to use screws and I had not even thought that that would creat a bridge...

    Mark,
    I will try the staggered wall for all non load bearing walls around the bathrooms, but I not sure how to do that with the ceiling of the living room which is the floor of the master bedroom.

    Frank,
    I have read about green glue and it looks like a great product but I that could be pushing my budget.


    So tapping the studs may be the cheapest method but not very effective? I should build staggered walls where possible, make sure to caulk all the joints and use some dense insulation between the studs.

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