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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    working overtime
    Posts
    851

    do I need special tools

    I just got a job working on more industrial equipment. I hope I do well, was wondering if chillers and very large tonnage systems will require new tools. I'm coming from the refrigeration and light commercial gig.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,478
    Quote Originally Posted by cavalieri85 View Post
    I just got a job working on more industrial equipment. I hope I do well, was wondering if chillers and very large tonnage systems will require new tools. I'm coming from the refrigeration and light commercial gig.
    Good for you, Cav!

    Off the top of my head, I'd say you'll need longer hoses and thermocouple wires.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Get a 4 port manifold set with a 3/8 port, speeds things up. 3/4" socket set with breaker bar. 115v impact and impact sockets to include Allen heads. Open end wrenches up to 2". Lifting straps and shackles. Laptop or smart phone to download and store manuals. Oh ya an assortment of pry bars up to 72". Good luck. One more thing, safety!! Everything is bigger and will hurt you if you let it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,134
    Yeah, working on big tonnage stuff takes some special tools sometimes. When you work with a real pro who has been at it for a long time and you see their tool-box, it's easy to get intimidated and down in the dumps over all the special stuff you need and don't have. At least that's the way it is for me.

    The important thing is to own your own stuff and to only buy high quality. Forget all of that 3/4" drive, 2" combination wrench, straps and shackles stuff (no disrespect intended to you, Tommy ) and focus on getting yourself set up with the basics. Wait to see what you're going to be working on to start out with. Once you find out, then fill in the gaps and deficiencies in your tool collection.

    When you buy a tool, ask yourself these things to start with:


    • Will this tool make my job safer, easier, or faster?


    • Will this tool make me more self-sufficient and less dependent on the company or my co-workers?


    • Will owning this tool help me to take on more responsibility and advance myself?


    • Will owning this tool demonstrate a commitment to the trade and an investment in myself that should be reciprocated by my employer?


    If you answered yes to any of those, you should have it.

    Also, congratulaions on the new job!
    The key to happiness is lower expectations.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,188
    Ive got a 2" wrench ill sell you. Ive been keeping it behind my drivers seat for protection. Lol

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,918
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    Yeah, working on big tonnage stuff takes some special tools sometimes. When you work with a real pro who has been at it for a long time and you see their tool-box, it's easy to get intimidated and down in the dumps over all the special stuff you need and don't have. At least that's the way it is for me.

    The important thing is to own your own stuff and to only buy high quality. Forget all of that 3/4" drive, 2" combination wrench, straps and shackles stuff (no disrespect intended to you, Tommy ) and focus on getting yourself set up with the basics. Wait to see what you're going to be working on to start out with. Once you find out, then fill in the gaps and deficiencies in your tool collection.

    When you buy a tool, ask yourself these things to start with:


    • Will this tool make my job safer, easier, or faster?


    • Will this tool make me more self-sufficient and less dependent on the company or my co-workers?


    • Will owning this tool help me to take on more responsibility and advance myself?


    • Will owning this tool demonstrate a commitment to the trade and an investment in myself that should be reciprocated by my employer?


    If you answered yes to any of those, you should have it.

    Also, congratulaions on the new job!
    Very well said.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    Yeah, working on big tonnage stuff takes some special tools sometimes. When you work with a real pro who has been at it for a long time and you see their tool-box, it's easy to get intimidated and down in the dumps over all the special stuff you need and don't have. At least that's the way it is for me.

    The important thing is to own your own stuff and to only buy high quality. Forget all of that 3/4" drive, 2" combination wrench, straps and shackles stuff (no disrespect intended to you, Tommy ) and focus on getting yourself set up with the basics. Wait to see what you're going to be working on to start out with. Once you find out, then fill in the gaps and deficiencies in your tool collection.

    When you buy a tool, ask yourself these things to start with:


    • Will this tool make my job safer, easier, or faster?


    • Will this tool make me more self-sufficient and less dependent on the company or my co-workers?


    • Will owning this tool help me to take on more responsibility and advance myself?


    • Will owning this tool demonstrate a commitment to the trade and an investment in myself that should be reciprocated by my employer?


    If you answered yes to any of those, you should have it.

    Also, congratulaions on the new job!
    This is good advise. That's pretty much how I ended up with the tools I mentioned.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Orange County N.Y.
    Posts
    1,176
    Quote Originally Posted by Core_d View Post
    Ive got a 2" wrench ill sell you. Ive been keeping it behind my drivers seat for protection. Lol
    Ya, I have one of them there Crescent 2" x 2' long wrenches on my truck too. I keep it in a bucket along with the 3/4", 1" breaker bars, and the larger than 1" combination wrenches. Big equipment needs big wrenches.

    ...Ron
    Roof Rat

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