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  1. #1
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    Space Station Closes Windows

    Ground control to Major Tux: Space station dumps Windows, now uses Linux

    "A United Space Alliance spokesperson told press the switch was made because ISS astronauts and cosmonauts needed an operating system 'that was stable and reliable.'

    Ouch!"

    http://venturebeat.com/2013/05/10/iss-linux/
    Vacuum Technology:
    CRUD = Contamination Resulting in Undesirable Deposits.
    CRAPP = Contamination Resulting in Additional Partial Pressure.

    Change your vacuum pump oil now.

    Test. Testing, 1,2,3.

  2. #2
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    International Space Station attacked by ‘virus epidemics’

    Malware made its way aboard the International Space Station (ISS) causing “virus epidemics” in space, according to security expert Eugene Kaspersky.

    Kaspersky, head of security firm Kaspersky labs, revealed at the Canberra Press Club 2013 in Australia that before the ISS switched from Windows XP to Linux computers, Russian cosmonauts managed to carry infected USB storage devices aboard the station spreading computer viruses to the connected computers.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...demics-malware
    http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/...aboard-the-iss
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/ISS-N...n-399760.shtml
    http://www.theatlanticwire.com/globa...stuxnet/71470/
    Vacuum Technology:
    CRUD = Contamination Resulting in Undesirable Deposits.
    CRAPP = Contamination Resulting in Additional Partial Pressure.

    Change your vacuum pump oil now.

    Test. Testing, 1,2,3.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,273
    A few years back, I was blessed to have bought a computer that came with Windows Vista. Shortly after, I installed Linux and never looked back... I'm sure many people who bought computers with Windows 8 will say the same Can't deny the improvements in security (no need for antiviruses), stability (blue screens of death on other people's computers make me laugh now) and performance (can stretch out the lifetime of my older computers). No wonder one of the biggest users of Free/Open software is the US Army (for those exact same reasons in addition to flexibility). Speaking of flexibility, because you are allowed (and encouraged) to look under the hood and tweak it, Linux drives a HUGE variety of devices, from personal and business desktop computers, to bank machines, to wireless routers, to cell phones (Android), to media players like TiVo, to robots and supercomputers (just to name a few uses).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Austin, TX
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    I have been using Linux on the desktop since I was in high school and switched to it exclusively when I went to college. Now I do plenty of development with desktop Linux as well as embedded Linux. I'm even using it (OpenWRT) as part of the controls (along with a dsPIC) for my current research project, an air conditioner that's also a heat pump water heater. I wonder if anyone else here owns a HVAC system (or even worked on one) that runs embedded Linux...

  5. #5
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    Sounds like the way to go. Can you recommend some How-To guides for converting my computer? Can I save my MS files in Linux?

    I still have my old Windows 98 and XP computers. Should I start with one of them?
    Vacuum Technology:
    CRUD = Contamination Resulting in Undesirable Deposits.
    CRAPP = Contamination Resulting in Additional Partial Pressure.

    Change your vacuum pump oil now.

    Test. Testing, 1,2,3.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,273
    Your computers seem to be pretty old. You definitely wanna replace the OS on the Win98 machine NOW since it's not getting any security updates and I heard they were gonna cut those off on XP starting next year (coming right up). Because you're running old hardware, you'll need to install a lightweight "distribution" of Linux without too many bells and whistles, but the interface will be simpler and cleaner. Some questions I wanna ask you in order to give you proper tips:
    1) What processors are you running on each computer and how much ram?
    2) What MS files are you talking about? (if it's MS Office stuff, then you can use Libre Office to good effect - you can even install it on your Windows machines to try out or to avoid having to pay for MS Office as Libre office is "free" both as in "free beer" and "free speech" )
    3) Which printers are you running?

    Note on Linux distributions - Since Linux can power anything from your watch to a supercomputer, it has lots of options when it comes to user interfaces, features and applications. For that reason, different teams distribute it differently, so some of them are more suited to modern desktop computers (lots of useful apps and eye candy but heavy on the system resources), some are for older hardware (less eye candy and fewer apps pre-installed), some are for servers, some are for wireless routers, LOTS of various options. You are probably looking at some lightweight desktop distributions for older hardware, and based on the info you give me, we can determine HOW LIGHTWEIGHT

  7. #7
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    Austin, TX
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    641
    It doesn't take much to run Linux.

    Here's a tool to help you decide:
    http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/
    It seems to recommend OpenSUSE or Fedora for you. You can also look at Xubuntu, a variant of Ubuntu designed for slower machines.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonrunner View Post
    Your computers seem to be pretty old. You definitely wanna replace the OS on the Win98 machine NOW since it's not getting any security updates and I heard they were gonna cut those off on XP starting next year (coming right up). Because you're running old hardware, you'll need to install a lightweight "distribution" of Linux without too many bells and whistles, but the interface will be simpler and cleaner. Some questions I wanna ask you in order to give you proper tips:
    1) What processors are you running on each computer and how much ram?
    2) What MS files are you talking about? (if it's MS Office stuff, then you can use Libre Office to good effect - you can even install it on your Windows machines to try out or to avoid having to pay for MS Office as Libre office is "free" both as in "free beer" and "free speech" )
    3) Which printers are you running?
    I'm not using the Win 98 and XP PC's. (I break out the XP once in a while when my Vista PC has a problem.) I don't have them hooked up. But they still work. I was wondering if it would be a good idea to install Linux on them before I try it on the Vista PC. The XP has MS Office on it.

    The Vista PC has an i7 CPU and 6GB ram. I have Libre Office installed on it. MS-wise, I just have the standard stuff that came with the PC. I'm not a gamer. I have two old HP printers: a deskjet 3650 and a seldom-used PSC 1610.

    But more to the point, I'm not just looking for info for my specific set-up. I appreciate your feedback, but I'm sure there are many of us on this forum who would benefit from a few well-chosen websites that would help us determine whether to convert and how best to go about it.

    My first stop will be the one NiHaoMike just suggested.
    Last edited by Space Racer; 12-13-2013 at 11:21 AM.
    Vacuum Technology:
    CRUD = Contamination Resulting in Undesirable Deposits.
    CRAPP = Contamination Resulting in Additional Partial Pressure.

    Change your vacuum pump oil now.

    Test. Testing, 1,2,3.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,273
    In general, if you can run Windows XP, you can run Lubuntu. If you don't have anything critical on your XP machine, you might as well download it and do a clean install. Since it's XP, I'm guessing it's a 32bit system, so you can go to this page, https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Lubuntu/GetLubuntu click on PC 32bit Standard Image, download, burn and boot your XP machine from the CD/DVD. The install is VERY simple.

    I like Lubuntu for old machines because it's light, it's simple and it's well-supported. Some standard desktop distributions like regular Ubuntu or Linux Mint can contain a lot of eye-candy that's heavy on the resources. For more modern desktop machines I like to run Linux Mint because it looks great, is stable, does what I want it to do and is easy to use as a DESKTOP system. Regular Ubuntu pulled the same crap as Microsoft did with Windows 8 and created something better suited for tablets. Looks nice but can't get work done on it.

    You're sittin' pretty with printers. HP printers have GREAT Linux support. In general all you need to do is plug it into the USB or point to it on the network and it gets installed on its own. No CD's/DVD's, don't have to download drivers or mess around too much. Found it to be a lot simpler than in Windows. Brother printers and MFC's are WELL supported but the install is complicated and easy to screw up. I run Brother MFC's here, but recommend HP to everyone else for home use.

    The biggest problem with Linux is that you get so much CHOICE that you can get lost sometimes. The reason people like Mac computers is that you don't get a choice, just do what the Apple corporation tells you and pay a hefty premium on hardware/software.

    For gaming, Linux isn't there yet, but at least Steam supports it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Some late model XP machines were 64 bit capable. The AMDs made it very clear with a big 64 in the logo, but Intels of that era need to be looked up.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64#...mplementations

    And contrary to claims, there are advantages to 64 bit even with less than 4GB of RAM. Integer operations can be done on larger values and more registers are available to the applications.

    The 98 machine sounds good for turning into a good router (especially if it was a lower end machine at the time), while the XP machine would make a good experimental machine. Once you know your way around, switch your Vista machine to Linux and then reinstall Windows in a VM if you might need to use it. That would also be a good time to add a SSD if the machine doesn't already have it, but don't create any swap as swap wears out SSDs. Create one big / (root) partition on the SSD and if there's a HDD as well, mount that as /bulk and use symlinks to allow access from other locations.

  11. #11
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    A router? That's an interesting possibility.
    The 98 has 4mb ram; the XP a gb (32bit).

    Excellent tips from both of you.

    In my search for info, I found these websites. They're packed with info. About.com is out of date, but it's an easy-to-use reference.

    http://linux.about.com/
    http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
    http://www.linux.org/
    http://community.ubuntu.com/help-information/
    http://www.thefreecountry.com/operating-systems/

    Once you know your way around, switch your Vista machine to Linux and then reinstall Windows in a VM if you might need to use it. That would also be a good time to add a SSD if the machine doesn't already have it, but don't create any swap as swap wears out SSDs. Create one big / (root) partition on the SSD and if there's a HDD as well, mount that as /bulk and use symlinks to allow access from other locations.
    That was quite a mouthful. Sounds like it's time to buy a SSD.

    What about live CD's? Do either of you (or anyone else) have any experience with these?
    Vacuum Technology:
    CRUD = Contamination Resulting in Undesirable Deposits.
    CRAPP = Contamination Resulting in Additional Partial Pressure.

    Change your vacuum pump oil now.

    Test. Testing, 1,2,3.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    641
    Knoppix is great for testing and fixing stuff (including Windows!), but I would suggest Kubuntu on the XP machine.

    No need to get a SSD now. Wait until you actually know your way around, at which point SSDs would have become (slightly) cheaper.

    Are you sure the 98 machine only has 4MB RAM? Even the low end 98 machines generally came with at least 32MB.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    5,582
    ?? NiHaoMike are U available for adoption??
    Tracers work both ways.

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