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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    13

    Fixing Outside Vent Question - Gas Furnace

    I have a gas furnace. I recently discovered that the manual says the intake and exhaust pipes should be 12" distance between each other but the installer only has 3" (picture attached). I want them to fix it so it is as it should be. I also would like to avoid another hole in the side of my house if possible. I came across this picture and was wondering if this would accomplish the same thing. Instead of putting the side by side distance 12" they added a gooseneck to the exhaust pipe so it is 12" vertical. Wouldn't that accomplish the same thing? Any help/advice would be appreciated.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,710
    while I cannot say, since you did not list make/model of your unit, you might reread your instructions again.

    This does NOT look incorrect, but could be for your unit.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,391
    The requirement is specific to your unit. Your contractor should find the proper way to install the termination in the installation manual
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    13
    I did not make any changes. The gooseneck picture is one I found online (I know it looks just like my house siding color). My manual says 12" distance so that is why I am writing on this forum to see if anyone can answer if the gooseneck would work or would I need them to cut another hole in the house and move the pipe over 12 inches?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,141
    The key is that the intake and the exhaust cannot recirculate and they must be located in the same pressure zone. The gooseneck will in all likelihood accomplish this. Have your installer check it the alternative venting options.
    ...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    13
    How would the installer check alternative venting options? I don't see anything in manual.

    Also what would happen if the exhaust ever did recirculate...would carbon monoxide and other gases spread throughout the house or would it just get sent back out the exhaust but shorten the life of the unit? As you can see I have no idea about any of this stuff...but it sounds scary. The installer obviously did not read the book and I want to make sure its done correct. If I don't need to have another hole in my house if the gooseneck would accomplish same thing I would like to know from all of you experts on here...much appreciated!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,744
    gooseneck would give you the required seperation

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,123
    Quote Originally Posted by t527ed View Post
    gooseneck would give you the required seperation
    Yep, goose neck would be fine.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Joplin,Missouri
    Posts
    310
    The gooseneck will accomplish the separation you are looking for. Keep in mind every 90 degree elbow you add is equivalent to five feet of pipe.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    Have your installer add the goose neck, creating the distance required for openings. As for the death smell you are experiencing, if it continues I would suggest a camera run in your duct systems. You never know and obviously we can't answer that one for you. Hope we helped.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    13
    Right now I have about 20 ft of pipe and 3 elbows. I am not good at this but that would give me around 35 ft at most. So if I had them add a 12" gooseneck to the end outside that would give add on around 11 more feet correct?

    So that makes it less than 50 feet and book says I can have up to 90.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Joplin,Missouri
    Posts
    310
    If that's what the installation manual says then you should be fine.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    1,815
    I am inclined to think that the existing set up will be alright but it could be improved.
    One suggestion is to extend the exhaust by adding a piece of pipe to the coupling. Your measurement should be from the end of one pipe to the end of the other pipe rather than from side to side. Verify that the intake is the pipe with the 90*.

    Your concern about gases entering the house is unfounded. Neither of those pipes connect to the duct system. However, problems can arise if the intake pipe is above the exhaust pipe which can draw the exhaust fumes back in to the combustion chamber. The decreased oxygen content will cause incomplete combustion and sooting.

    Lennox originally specified 36" separation for the pipes for the Pulse furnace but even that distance was not adequate under all conditions. They then used the configuration shown in your photo. By extending the exhaust 10-12" from the wall the gases could disperse without being drawn in the other pipe.

    If the pipes are close to the height of expected snow accumulation then they should both be raised with goose necks.

    BTW, you may paint the outside of the pipes to match your siding.

    Conclusion: As long as the vent gases don't recirculate, don't obsess over it.

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