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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Hiram, Ohio
    Posts
    221

    I suppose I read too much..

    Call me crazy, but this HVAC stuff is very interesting. I spend a lot of time here reading posts. Anyway, if removing moisture from a system can be done easier the higher the temperatures are... does anyone run the customer's furnace while evacuating? This would bring the evap temp up to 120 degrees or so, wouldn't that make things easier? Or AM I nuts? Don't answer that last question. Thanks, Mike.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,398
    If there is moisture in the evaporator it will help. Keep in mind most of the time, that scenario will happen in the summer whn it is HOT outside. The homeowner will not appreciate the heat running into an already warm house. May also trip the limit if the house is excessively warm.
    Climate Control Solutions for your Home or Office

    Serving Northeast Philadelphia and Surrounding Areas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,337
    Quote Originally Posted by troyport View Post
    Call me crazy, but this HVAC stuff is very interesting. I spend a lot of time here reading posts. Anyway, if removing moisture from a system can be done easier the higher the temperatures are... does anyone run the customer's furnace while evacuating? This would bring the evap temp up to 120 degrees or so, wouldn't that make things easier? Or AM I nuts? Don't answer that last question. Thanks, Mike.
    Your not crazy. Done it before.

    It's actually kinda weird. You'll turn the furnace on, and your moisture reading goes up. Then it goes down like a rock.

    Sometimes when you do a compressor replacement, a receiver will be full of liquid refrigerant, so you can leave for a bit while it pumps, or hit the receiver with the torch.


    But yeah, it works.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    155
    Often use a heat gun but be careful; they can remove paint.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Not a bad idea to speed up the process a little. Do furnace start-up first while pumping down the AC unit.

    120F is only a 50F temp rise, a lot of system will be closer to 125-135F with 70F return temp if it runs long enough. Some modulating furnaces will reach almost 145F in lower stages.

    On larger commercial/industrial chillers the ONLY way to get all the moisture out is to add some heat. The last one we we used a little 120VAC residential water heater and a small circulation pupms. it still took 3-4 weeks to get all the moisture out. Yes, that's weeks... not hours or days. The chillers was completely flooded.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Hiram, Ohio
    Posts
    221
    Okay, thanks for the reply. My thought process was this: The tech is coming back on Saturday to evac, but since we are at the time of year where the furnace does not run much if at all, the basement, where the evap is of course, is quite cool.. So I thought I would sacrifice a little propane and run the furnace while it is being evacuated.. Maybe help the guy out and get a better result for me. Mike.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    I'd let him do it. The result should be the same either way, just speed up the process a little. There's usually enough installation work to be done, that you set the vaccum pump, then work on the wiring, finish any sheetmetal work, go get lunch, etc. Remember that when you get near a full vacuum, water flashes off pretty rapidly whether it's 70F or 130F. Sure, not as fast, but still pretty fast.

    Keep in mind that most furnaces should not be run with a return temp over 80F and condensing furnaces which use outside air, and outside air temp of 80F.

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