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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Using Trane TAM7 air handler to circulate warm air

    I'm currently looking into a new AC and one salesman said something interesting. I have a natural gas burner pumping hot water through cast iron radiators. We find these radiators cause uneven heat within the room. One salesman said the TAM7 could be run all year and in the winter it would help draw and mix the air. Wondering what the professionals think about this? Can this air handler be used this way?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
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    14,914
    Yes, and there is a hydronic heating coil option for it, so you could temper the air so it isn't moving unheated air around, and/or use it as the primary heat source in mild weather.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    90
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Yes, and there is a hydronic heating coil option for it, so you could temper the air so it isn't moving unheated air around, and/or use it as the primary heat source in mild weather.
    I have no plan to add a heat coil....what about just running the air handler on "fan" with the regular heat going?

    Radiators are very large and all located under windows. This results in one side of the room bring warmer than the other. The basement which is finished and 1000sqft is the biggest issue. There is one large 10ft long radiator located in the opposite corner as the stairs. That area is warm and as you move closer to the stairs it gets colder. The basement is NOT air conditioned and it has no duct work. Wondering if I left the basement door open (there's an AC return located at the top of the stairs) would the air handler on fan draw air towards the stairs from the radiator and more evenly warm the basement?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    68,069
    Quote Originally Posted by idmd View Post
    I have no plan to add a heat coil....what about just running the air handler on "fan" with the regular heat going?

    Radiators are very large and all located under windows. This results in one side of the room bring warmer than the other. The basement which is finished and 1000sqft is the biggest issue. There is one large 10ft long radiator located in the opposite corner as the stairs. That area is warm and as you move closer to the stairs it gets colder. The basement is NOT air conditioned and it has no duct work. Wondering if I left the basement door open (there's an AC return located at the top of the stairs) would the air handler on fan draw air towards the stairs from the radiator and more evenly warm the basement?

    Probably not, since there is no supply to move the air.
    Your boiler water temp is probably set to high. or the boiler is over sized too much and heating the rads to quick.

    Is any of the duct work in the attic. if so, you don't want to use it in fan "on" mode in the winter. it could cause condensation in the ducts. If the duct work is all in conditioned space, then yes it will help a little. But may cause you to feel a cool draft.
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  5. #5
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Your boiler water temp is probably set to high. or the boiler is over sized too much and heating the rads to quick.

    Is any of the duct work in the attic. if so, you don't want to use it in fan "on" mode in the winter. it could cause condensation in the ducts. If the duct work is all in conditioned space, then yes it will help a little. But may cause you to feel a cool draft.
    I just had a heat gain/loss done for the AC....the results said I need about 75k for heating and I have 110k. The boiler is only about 5 years old and in really good condition. The system also suffers from wild swings in temp. If you set the t-stat at 68F and the heat kicks on the room temps may go as high as 73-74F. I've always believed this was partly due to radiators that got too hot too quickly and the long period of latent heat provided by cast iron radiators.

    Are you saying I can partially mitigate my oversized boiler by just turning the water temp down--->radiators don't get as hot as quickly---->less "overshooting" desired temp?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Lancaster PA
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    Yep. If the installers set the temp to more then 160, setting it lower will help a lot. Also, it could be your thermostat is causing the wide temp swings. What brand and model number is it.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    90
    Oh t-stat is a cheap RiteTemp model 6022 from Home Depot.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2004
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    Lancaster PA
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    Might want a good thermostat.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Any recommendations? AC and heat are on different T-stats.

  10. #10
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    Jan 2004
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    Lancaster PA
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    Honeywell 8000 series, or IAQ.
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  11. #11
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    Apr 2013
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    Thank you!

  12. #12
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    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
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    Keep in mind tha blwoing ari around hte house has soem advantages, but to move enough air to balance the temps, you'd use a fair amount of energy as well as defeat some fo hte point of having radiant heat.

    As mentoned, I think the temp is set too high. If the boiler is more than 25 year old, you might consider upgrading it to a condensing boiler wiht outdoor reset that can runn cooler water temps in mild weather.

    You might also consider a heat pump for mild weather (above 35-40F) and set-up the boiler/rads as the back-up heat.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    90
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Keep in mind tha blwoing ari around hte house has soem advantages, but to move enough air to balance the temps, you'd use a fair amount of energy as well as defeat some fo hte point of having radiant heat.

    As mentoned, I think the temp is set too high. If the boiler is more than 25 year old, you might consider upgrading it to a condensing boiler wiht outdoor reset that can runn cooler water temps in mild weather.

    You might also consider a heat pump for mild weather (above 35-40F) and set-up the boiler/rads as the back-up heat.

    I'll have the temp checked. The radiators get hot enough to burn you after a few seconds. They are recessed under all the windows with not covering and no way to cover them. Is there any disadvantage to turning the water temp down to say 140 or 150F? I understand that the system may need run longer but I'd prefer a slower increase in temps. Also, I'm going to invest in a better t-stat.

    Thank you

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