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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,312
    I seem to remember another big manufacturer trying variable speed compressors, and them failing miserably.

    Put in a tried and true system, and when you go to replace that system put in the super system.

    If it ends up being that the greenspeed IS awesome, then great. Good for them. You missed out on a little bit better comfort, and a slight amount of energy savings.

    If it ends up with greenspeed being a complete flop, then you've saved yourself years of headache, and more money than the system could have possibly saved you.


    Honestly, I'm still not sold on some manufacturers modulating furnaces, and they've been out for years.

    I think you'll be more comfortable dumping the money from the greenspeed upgrade, into Ultra-Aire equipment.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,428
    Quote Originally Posted by wensteph View Post
    If I read this right, then I've got 5-6 months of muggy, but not particularly hot days. Red line average high dew point, blue line average low.

    Attachment 378501
    RED-LINE TIME PERIOD > 60'F needs A/C and/or dehumidification.
    That's just ABOUT 7 months ... April - October.

    NICE ILLUSTRATION.!
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,428
    Quote Originally Posted by wensteph View Post
    We're in the process of designing a new house, although that seems to be on hold due to no offer on our present house. General plan is to build a tight house with foam and good windows. I plan on having Manual J, D and S run by an independent firm to have as a second opinion to contractor.

    I will also be very open to a ventilating dehumidifier and something like an Aprilaire motorized damper for fresh air exchange.
    http://pros.marvin.com/benefits-feat...windows-doors/

    SHGC < 0.38

    VT > 0.58 ... Light Transmittance
    Last edited by dan sw fl; 04-30-2013 at 07:23 AM.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Quote Originally Posted by wensteph View Post
    If I read this right, then I've got 5-6 months of muggy, but not particularly hot days. Red line average high dew point, blue line average low.

    Attachment 378501
    Absolutely. The killer is times when outdoor dewpoints are above 50F, but outdoor temperatures are under 80F. Even more, since you'll hav low-E windows, your sensible heat gain will be even lower. With a good spray foam desing and if you can pick materials to maximize thermal mass (tile rock, stone, concrete, plaster (I know nobody does plaster anymore), hardwood) WITHIN the insulated envelope, it will make a huge difference. Wood also acts like a dessicant and will level off spikes in humidity. For example depsite being over 75 and sunny outside for more than 16 hours, my home only gained 4F over that period and my AC never even came on. The high amount of mass in my home, took a long time to heat up. It also takes a long time to cool off.

    For heating, if you insulate it well, in your climate you'r rarely if ever need heating, even wiht a conventional heat pump. I would look at a regular 2 stage heat pump system with humidity control and ventilation controls. A mid range system like a Carrier Performance/Comfrot series system or Trane XR series would work well with a Honeywell IAQ thermostat and a whole house dehumidifier and ERV.


    Look at that chart, with a spray foam house, you have about 4 months of heating but you lower rarely get under even 35F, 3 months where you probably only need a dehumidifier with good shading, a cool roof design and low-e windows, 2 months of moderately hot weather when it's still very humid but you only need a little AC, so the dehumidifier is still improtant, then 3 months of hot weather whenre hte AC can do most all of hte dehumidification if designed well.

    In your climate, a sucessful building desing would only need a 2 ton heat pump for heating and cooling loads for a home as large as 3000sqft if it had a dehumidifier to manage the latent load.

    Again, think mass. If I could build a home, it would use a lot of concerete, tile, brick, stone and stucco and hardwood.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,637
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Absolutely. The killer is times when outdoor dewpoints are above 50F, but outdoor temperatures are under 80F. Even more, since you'll hav low-E windows, your sensible heat gain will be even lower. With a good spray foam desing and if you can pick materials to maximize thermal mass (tile rock, stone, concrete, plaster (I know nobody does plaster anymore), hardwood) WITHIN the insulated envelope, it will make a huge difference. Wood also acts like a dessicant and will level off spikes in humidity. For example depsite being over 75 and sunny outside for more than 16 hours, my home only gained 4F over that period and my AC never even came on. The high amount of mass in my home, took a long time to heat up. It also takes a long time to cool off.

    For heating, if you insulate it well, in your climate you'r rarely if ever need heating, even wiht a conventional heat pump. I would look at a regular 2 stage heat pump system with humidity control and ventilation controls. A mid range system like a Carrier Performance/Comfrot series system or Trane XR series would work well with a Honeywell IAQ thermostat and a whole house dehumidifier and ERV.


    Look at that chart, with a spray foam house, you have about 4 months of heating but you lower rarely get under even 35F, 3 months where you probably only need a dehumidifier with good shading, a cool roof design and low-e windows, 2 months of moderately hot weather when it's still very humid but you only need a little AC, so the dehumidifier is still improtant, then 3 months of hot weather whenre hte AC can do most all of hte dehumidification if designed well.

    In your climate, a sucessful building desing would only need a 2 ton heat pump for heating and cooling loads for a home as large as 3000sqft if it had a dehumidifier to manage the latent load.

    Again, think mass. If I could build a home, it would use a lot of concerete, tile, brick, stone and stucco and hardwood.
    Could not have said it myself. Change the dehumidifier to a ventilating whole house dehumidifier for fresh air ventilation to purge indoor pollutants during calm warm weather. That;s all. Ok, an Ultra-Aire would be nice.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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