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  1. #1

    Confused w/ what size 2 ton or 2.5 ton

    Here's the story, my current system is a 2.5 ton AH w/ 3.5 HP and its on its last legs so looking to get it replaced.

    So far i have I have been told to get a 2 ton HP and AH but the other guy says 2.5 ton is better. I currently live in a small townhome which is 1200 sqft but has a basement not including the sqft. I reside in MD so temps can get about 15 degrees at lowest to 90 degrees avg in summer. The system I'm looking at getting is a 2 stage HP w/ variable speeds AH. Dunno if that makes the difference in size. They both are quoted in about same price rance as one is a Bryant Evolution and other is Trane (don't recall which model thou.)

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,700
    A H/P is generally oversized for the heating side of the operation. 2 tons of cooling is more than enough for your town home. With lows of only 15 degrees, I guess I would recommend the 2 ton H/P for better second floor (cooling) comfort.

    That said, the Bryant guy has a computer program that will run the operating comparison costs between the 2 ton and the 2.5 ton. With the smaller 2 ton unit, during the winter, you'll be running on resistance heat ($$$$) more often, but it'll cost less (and better comfort) to A/C during the summer. It could be a small trade off. Let him show you the difference.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    518
    depending on availability and prices of nat. gas in your lacal. you may come out better going w/ a forced air furnace instead of the airhandler and it could be a better match to the manual j load calcs. that weren't mentioned

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    In your climate, It's still fairly humid in summer. I'd lean towards the 2 ton and be careful not to use any setbacks on the coldest. The evolution is very, very nice. Very quiet, low warm airflows when heating and excellent humidity control. If you can afford it, consider the Evolution Extreme heat pump. It won't need heat strips hardly at all even at 15F.

    I have 2 Carrier Infinity systems in my home, absolutely love them. Even our local commerical Trane area sales/service rep admits that on the residential side, its' still probably the best overall system out there. Trane makes very nice units as well. IF you have enough ductwork, you could consider a 3 tons XL20i. DO NOT however oversize a XL16i... EVER! Poor latent capacity (humidity removal) on low stage when oversized at all. Also the heating capacity on the XL16i is pretty low too. A 2.5 Ton XL15i would be a better choice IMO if you can;t afford the XL20i. With the Evolution extreme, you'd want a 3 ton unit as well.

  5. #5
    I was able to contact the Byrant sales rep and he actually showed me calculation for the size is recommended. Shows cooling is 1.7 ton and heating is 19,200 btus which means 2 ton is recommended.

    On the other hand the Trane sales rep didn't even use a calc and just said on his experience for my size of town home should be 2.5 ton HP w/ 3 ton air handler.

    So, im at lost really.

    As of the equipment break down..

    Trane - TRANE XB 13 2.5 ton HP w/ XB Airhandler 3 ton Multispeed motor comes w/ a emergency heater strip.

    Bryant - Model 286B Evolution system 2 ton HP w/ 2 ton Model FE Airhandler. But I don't see anything that says it has an emergency heat strip? (can someone clear on this)

    The prices on these 2 are different in a long shot. So which is a better choice?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,989
    Did the guy who did the calc., show you what some cost-effective retro-work would do for lowering both heat & cool loads?

    Could possibly do a few cost effective things to make the 2-Ton the better choice; which will improve airflow & overall efficiencies.

  7. #7
    Yea he mentioned will add "arc fins" on top of the air handler that pushes out the air to other vents. Also will expand a larger duct from AH to other ducts.

    )))(((( <--- arc fins (pushes air to left and right instead straight to top
    | |
    | | <----- air blower

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,295
    Quote Originally Posted by mickeykool View Post
    I was able to contact the Byrant sales rep and he actually showed me calculation for the size is recommended. Shows cooling is 1.7 ton and heating is 19,200 btus which means 2 ton is recommended.

    On the other hand the Trane sales rep didn't even use a calc and just said on his experience for my size of town home should be 2.5 ton HP w/ 3 ton air handler.

    So, im at lost really.

    Bryant - Model 286B Evolution system 2 ton HP w/ 2 ton Model FE Airhandler.
    But I don't see anything that says it has an emergency heat strip? (can someone clear on this)

    So which is a better choice?
    You are not the one who is confused,
    TRANE representative is acting Old School and Very Lazy. DO NOT WASTE ANY MORE TIME WITH THIS TRANE FELLOW.

    Two 3 kW heat strips would be required for EMERGENCY Heat ( without a N.G. furnace).
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    I should also mention I have no gas line to my house. So everything is electric.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,295
    Quote Originally Posted by mickeykool View Post
    I should also mention I have no gas line to my house. So everything is electric.
    BRYANT model 225B may have a little better HSPF rating.
    You probably only have 300 hours per year at less than 20'F in MD.

    Similar,
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    provides 16,550 Total BTU/HR with 1.81 kW at 17'F
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    518
    yes Dan is on point dont catch that trane

  12. #12
    Thanks for all your responses, I ended up going w/ Brant system. Hopefully this is a good choice for me.

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