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Thread: Im very sick...

  1. #14
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    This is your second really bad illness in the last couple of months. Unless you never got over the first one. Hopefully you've seen a doctor and are listening to him.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....he-last-4-days

  2. #15
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    Jun 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by newoldtech View Post
    This is your second really bad illness in the last couple of months. Unless you never got over the first one. Hopefully you've seen a doctor and are listening to him.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....he-last-4-days
    Yeah I told corny to give up his unfiltered camels and check himself into a hospice where they can put him out of his misery and in no time he will never feel anymore pain. LOL
    "I could have ended the war in a month. I could have made North Vietnam look like a mud puddle."
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    Barry Goldwater

  3. #16
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
    Sorry to hear that corny. Hop you get better soon.


    I have my own health problems. Had an allergic reaction to our new fire rated uniforms, got so bad that it is even with me wearing normal clothes. Feels like cross between sunburn and a carpet burn. Work will not accommodate me in wearing my old uniforms so I am off work. Been spending most of my time documenting this (started in February, many meetings with management) and researching probable causes. They are trying to set it up so if I can not wear the new uniform I am out on the street. You would think a hospital would be more caring.
    Not familiar with the fire/flash protection regs.

    Any way to wear an undershirt with that gear? Like UnderArmour? That would keep it off of your skin and possibly prevent any reactions.

    Once your skin has settled down, that is...


    I, for one, am NOT looking forward to that stuff. It's bad enough working on the roof in the summer with a t-shirt and jeans on. Long sleeves, hard hat, face shield.

  4. #17
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    Mar 2009
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    Mid-Mo
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    Quote Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
    Sorry to hear that corny. Hop you get better soon.


    I have my own health problems. Had an allergic reaction to our new fire rated uniforms, got so bad that it is even with me wearing normal clothes. Feels like cross between sunburn and a carpet burn. Work will not accommodate me in wearing my old uniforms so I am off work. Been spending most of my time documenting this (started in February, many meetings with management) and researching probable causes. They are trying to set it up so if I can not wear the new uniform I am out on the street. You would think a hospital would be more caring.
    I don't think this is all that uncommon. One of our guys had the same thing happen to him. He finally got a doctors note saying he couldn't wear them, so the company issued him some of our old uniforms.

    If you get your hands on the msds sheet for these FR uniforms, the list of chemicals on it is crazy.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    SE Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by newoldtech View Post
    This is your second really bad illness in the last couple of months. Unless you never got over the first one. Hopefully you've seen a doctor and are listening to him.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....he-last-4-days
    Its watching too much MSLSD....make anybody sick.
    "Politicians are the lowest form of life on Earth. Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politician"

    - General George S. Patton

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Not familiar with the fire/flash protection regs.

    Any way to wear an undershirt with that gear? Like UnderArmour? That would keep it off of your skin and possibly prevent any reactions.

    Once your skin has settled down, that is...


    I, for one, am NOT looking forward to that stuff. It's bad enough working on the roof in the summer with a t-shirt and jeans on. Long sleeves, hard hat, face shield.
    Any undergarments have to be natural products such as 100% cotton or silk, or a product like nomex that is designed to protect from burns. UnderArmour is a polyester which is a no-no. With the natural materials , when exposed to an arc flash they burn. Synthetic materials not designed to protect you melts into your skin in arc flash/fire. Much more serious an injury than having the skin burned. They can treat burned skin, basically have to cut out the skin that the plastic is infused in. Just a quick tidbit here, those hazard vests you wear to make you more visible to vehicles or heavy machinery can light up like a candle.



    Not that up on the regs in your country about electrical licensing but everyone up here that does some electrical work is suppose to be licensed and most jurisdictions are adopting arc flash regs. For you guys that is NFPA 70E standard, "Standard For Electrical Safety In the Workplace." There are different levels of protection required depending on the energy available. I would say generally that for 120-240V equipment that are a reasonable distance from the distribution box you are good with safety glasses, cotton long sleeve shirts and jeans. Gloves are an important part as usually your hands are the closest part of your body to the arc. A group in Germany did a study of arc flash incidents in that country and over 50% of the injuries happened to the hands and face. The torso injuries only accounted for about 10% but in those 10% the fatality rate increases rapidly.

    Above 240V, 377V and 460V and us 600V is more dangerous. You generally have more short circuit current available and enough voltage to keep an arc going. Also with three phase circuits you have a voltage available at all times. With 120 and 240 the voltage goes down to zero in half a cycle and the arc can extinguish itself. One peculiarity we have to deal with is with motors on our fans pumps and compressors. They can act a as generators and supply voltage and current in an arc fault. Oops, got sidetract.

    Anyway I am guessing more of you will have to comply with the regs over time. And being many of you work in hot and humid environments being to the south of me (mind you it has got up to 99F up here in summer) the heavier layer of clothing may cause some the same problem I have now. I have an idea that what caused it for me was a combination of the heat (hot mechanical rooms), the clothes do not breath, the laundry service we use sent back the clothes with a residual ph value that was alkaline. I am pretty sure I know what my affliction is but will let the medical professionals do their thing, I am sure they are all smarter than I am.
    Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference. —Mark Twain

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