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  1. #1

    Confused Commercial technician, thinking about switching to residential.

    Good idea?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    3,082
    No


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    545
    Why?

    Profits are slimmer, customers are more difficult, more involved, demanding and cheaper, the work is not as challenging. I would switch to all commercial if I could

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Phoenix, Az
    Posts
    1,245
    I would go back to resi if I were all out of options, but I would be miserable.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by LKJoel View Post
    Why?

    Profits are slimmer, customers are more difficult, more involved, demanding and cheaper, the work is not as challenging. I would switch to all commercial if I could

    How is the work not as challenging?... it seems like it would be WAY more challenging to do commercial, just because the equipment is heavier, and your dealing with more then 1 person... My teacher said in commercial your going to have a skinny girl closer to the furnace thats too cold, and a fat girl at the end of the hall, thats too hot.

    It seems like you would have to do way more work too, because in residential if the unit and a bunch of parts break down you can recommend replacing the whole unit.... doesnt seem so with commercial.

    Wouldnt working on roof tops, and heaters in high places make it seem way more challenging

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    2,155
    Quote Originally Posted by comoutsid322 View Post
    How is the work not as challenging?... it seems like it would be WAY more challenging to do commercial, just because the equipment is heavier, and your dealing with more then 1 person... My teacher said in commercial your going to have a skinny girl closer to the furnace thats too cold, and a fat girl at the end of the hall, thats too hot.

    It seems like you would have to do way more work too, because in residential if the unit and a bunch of parts break down you can recommend replacing the whole unit.... doesnt seem so with commercial.

    Wouldnt working on roof tops, and heaters in high places make it seem like more work.
    Not trying to bust your balls here, but you might want to rethink HVAC as a career choice. If you would rather sell a new unit just because "a bunch of parts break down", than tackle troubleshooting the unit, this may not be right for you. Your last comment of "seem like more work"...wow...
    Don't worry zombies are looking for brains, you're safe...

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ControlsInMT View Post
    Not trying to bust your balls here, but you might want to rethink HVAC as a career choice. If you would rather sell a new unit just because "a bunch of parts break down", than tackle troubleshooting the unit, this may not be right for you. Your last comment of "seem like more work"...wow...
    I meant challenging. I changed it. he said profit margins are lower, it just seems like residential would be higher because if a few componants break down you can recommend replacing the unit and get a percentage of the new unit. And with residential you have more clients, so it seems like you would have more profit.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by comoutsid322 View Post
    How is the work not as challenging?... it seems like it would be WAY more challenging to do commercial, just because the equipment is heavier, and your dealing with more then 1 person... My teacher said in commercial your going to have a skinny girl closer to the furnace thats too cold, and a fat girl at the end of the hall, thats too hot.

    It seems like you would have to do way more work too, because in residential if the unit and a bunch of parts break down you can recommend replacing the whole unit.... doesnt seem so with commercial.

    Wouldnt working on roof tops, and heaters in high places make it seem way more challenging
    I intended to say that in general commercial work presented more challenges (I view that as a positive). But either line of work presents a different set of challenges to be considered.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by LKJoel View Post
    I intended to say that in general commercial work presented more challenges (I view that as a positive). But either line of work presents a different set of challenges to be considered.
    oooo okay. Imma be honest, im not in commercial right now. I just wanted to compare and contrast commercial vs. residential. Theres a job opening for a commercial apprentice.

    One thing i am scared of is heights. In residential i dont have to worry about heights at all where im from.

    How could residential be more involved? it seems like commercial would be more involved...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    545
    Quote Originally Posted by comoutsid322 View Post
    oooo okay. Imma be honest, im not in commercial right now. I just wanted to compare and contrast commercial vs. residential. Theres a job opening for a commercial apprentice.

    One thing i am scared of is heights. In residential i dont have to worry about heights at all where im from.

    How could residential be more involved? it seems like commercial would be more involved...
    Your post title "commercial technician, thinking of moving to resi" led me to believe that you were already working in the commercial field, and debating a move to resi. My comments therefore were intended to be descriptive of my perception of the resi market, and my preference (I prefer commercial work)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Phoenix, Az
    Posts
    1,245
    Im scared of heights as well. I just stay away from the edges of roofs, problem solved.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    99
    It's harder to convince residential customers to pay that amount for their appliance to be fix, and they usually ask several technicians before having it service. As for commercial places, the owner wants their equipment fix ASAP, they need to do their business man. I would want ALL COMMERCIAL work if possible.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Mixing oil and fire with a big spoon.
    Posts
    4,347
    residential repairs are not mandatory...if they don't have money...you no worky. plus they can get more bids. because of this, the profit margins CAN be slimmer, however, they can be higher too because the customers tend not to have any technical knowledge.

    commercial repairs are mandatory (generally) because of business requirements. but commercial customers tend to be more knowledgable because they need to be.

    residential work tends to be exactly the same 'day in and day out' but then you get to really know the equipment and the problems pretty quickly and you also get to go home at night

    commercial work tends to never be exactly the same everyday. this is where it can be challenging, however, since it is always different, it tends to be difficult to stay 'up to speed'.

    a great tech in either field is very valuable.

    i prefer commercial and industrial work. lots of it. i love the challenge!
    "Mother" is the name for God on the lips and hearts of children....The Crow

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