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  1. #1

    Need advise-W/I condensate routing.

    OK, I'm an electrician helping out my wife's business and we are stuck with the Los Angeles County Health department plan check.

    We had a 2000sq' freezer installed by the manufacturer a couple years ago. Because there is no floor sink, and on advise from our refrigeration guy, we installed a condensate pump that pumps to the roof area near the condenser and all works well. Now the health department plan check person says "floor drain or mop sink only".

    There is no floor drain available and we could put in a mop sink but the distance required and the layout would not allow the 1\4" per foot drop needed. The freezer is not moveable-would cost thousands, as it is anchored down and the inside floor is concrete poured over foam sheets for insulation. Installing the mop sink closer would require saw cutting the floor and tons of money and the building owner probably will not allow it.

    My questions are:
    Is it true that a condensate pump is not allowed in our area? (Los Angeles)
    and is it true that pumping outside (on the roof) is not allowed in our area?
    If all that is true...any suggestions?

    Our company hasn't shown the profit survive a large expense at this time. We are worried.

    Thanks,
    John

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    4,564
    Are they concerned about the pump or the fact that it discharges to the roof. Could you just run the pump hose to your existing mop sink or floor drain? Or do they require a gravity drain?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by craig1 View Post
    Are they concerned about the pump or the fact that it discharges to the roof. Could you just run the pump hose to your existing mop sink or floor drain? Or do they require a gravity drain?
    Hi Craig,

    Both the pump and the roof discharge, they say, are unacceptable. The drain line would be a total of about 60' to the current mop sink area. It is inside of a packaged food warehouse. That's why the Health dept became interested.

    In my experience as an electrician, sometimes these "authorities" can be wrong. I'm hoping someone with Los Angeles experience can advise me.

    Thanks, John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    802
    I have no idea about your area, but in my area (Raleigh, NC) they recently changed the codes so you cannot discharge condensate into the sanitary sewer at all. No floor drains, no mop sinks. You have to pipe it outside, either via pump or gravity.

    I can't imagine why an AHJ would have a problem with pumping to the roof? Maybe they need to be gently shown that the pump/check valve acts as a trap?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    321
    FWIW, I have seen a major grocery chain pump condensate to the roof. I don't recall if it terminated into the sanitary sewer or the storm sewer (I wasn't involved in that part of the install) but I know they did it--and do it--in all 50 states. Maybe you could ask if that would be permissible--i.e., pumping it onto the roof, then into either a RTU condensate drain (if it terminates where they want it to, i.e. sewer or storm drain) or just a run a new line on the roof to wherever they want it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Cochrane, AB
    Posts
    622
    Is the pump inside the cooler? That may be the problem.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,071
    I live in Los Angeles and see lots of vacuum drain systems in supermarkets (Costco, Trader Joe's, Target, Ralphs) that don't have floor sinks.

    The vacuum system removes the water via~the vacuum system, and dumps in down into the sewer.

    http://www.acornvac.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Hallandale Beach, FL.
    Posts
    437
    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    I live in Los Angeles and see lots of vacuum drain systems in supermarkets (Costco, Trader Joe's, Target, Ralphs) that don't have floor sinks.

    The vacuum system removes the water via~the vacuum system, and dumps in down into the sewer.

    http://www.acornvac.com/
    Interesting!
    I miss you mom and dad.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by Electric John View Post
    OK, I'm an electrician helping out my wife's business and we are stuck with the Los Angeles County Health department plan check.

    We had a 2000sq' freezer installed by the manufacturer a couple years ago. Because there is no floor sink, and on advise from our refrigeration guy, we installed a condensate pump that pumps to the roof area near the condenser and all works well. Now the health department plan check person says "floor drain or mop sink only".

    There is no floor drain available and we could put in a mop sink but the distance required and the layout would not allow the 1\4" per foot drop needed. The freezer is not moveable-would cost thousands, as it is anchored down and the inside floor is concrete poured over foam sheets for insulation. Installing the mop sink closer would require saw cutting the floor and tons of money and the building owner probably will not allow it.

    My questions are:
    Is it true that a condensate pump is not allowed in our area? (Los Angeles)
    and is it true that pumping outside (on the roof) is not allowed in our area?
    If all that is true...any suggestions?

    Our company hasn't shown the profit survive a large expense at this time. We are worried.

    Thanks,
    John
    The City of Los Angeles has very strict codes. I'm dealing with some now. Here is a link to info: http://ladbs.org/LADBSWeb/codes.jsf

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,924

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    North west Arkansas
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post


    That's not the word that I use for them.
    Dealt with these before huh?? Just reading about it, it seems like a lot of hoops to jump through for a condensate drain,, can't you use a simple evaporator pan on top of the unit, ??

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    I think I use the same words you do for them.

    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post


    That's not the word that I use for them.

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