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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    11

    Not sure if i should take this job offer

    Hello all. I am new to this site and also new to the HVAC world. In my second semester at school now and have only taken Intro to refrigeration, comfort cooling, intro to electricity and heat pump. I had sent an email out appyling for a job and the owner ended up calling me. He asked me some questions about my resume and other things and then asked me what I honestly wanted to do in this field. I told him I was very interested in Refrigeration more than anything else. The owner told me that although he really wanted to hire me after talking with me and having spoke to my previous employers, he did not want me to possibly become an asset to him or in residential in general, and then down the road want to move into refrigeration and have to basically "start over" is what he said. Should I take the job since it's becoming summer and get the hands on experience and then decide after working for him if I think I want to stick with residential or move on and continue with my path in refrigeration? What do you guys think about this for someone just getting starting out? I'm a tall guy and feel like crawling under houses and up in attics is going to get old quick. Thanks for any insight. Again I am new to all of this and willing to put in the work regardless the situation, just want some insight from some other people in the field other than my instructors.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Russellville TN and DeLand Fl
    Posts
    65
    If you want to do Refrigeration, that's where you need to start. You will at least know what you are getting into.
    " If its Tourist Season, why cant we shoot them?"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,274
    Tuff choice...

    I agree with do Refer work if that is what you want to do... however,
    If the only job you can get now is residential... I would get some hands on regardless.

    Most of what you learn will be hands on... the school part is just the basic head stuff. The sooner you get used to electrical troubleshooting and understanding the refrigerant loop... the sooner all this stuff will make sense.

    Learn, learn, learn... yet most of your learning probably will be hands on, not in school.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    11
    He told me to call him back if I changed my mind and then emailed two days later telling me he enjoyed talking with me and hoped I would reconsider and give him a call.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,274
    Guy sees something in you he is interested in... that is worth something.

    I would at least talk to him and see what comes of it. Might work out good for both of you for a while. Better than graduating from school with a degree and no experience. When you do graduate... you can go to a commercial refer co and say you have some experience... albeit residential. That is better than no experience.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Government base in the woods.
    Posts
    171
    Why not take the job. I started out in residential then moved to commercial then to industrial. You can do whatever you put your mind to the only person limiting you is you.
    "Here in Carolina We Get-R-Done"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    11
    Well I am 26, 6'3 and slim. I'm also about to get married next year and probably have a kid in the next three. I have a feeling my height will affect me worse off in residential. Also I am trying to think of my career and future and from what I have read the money is in commercial. I know it will have its challenges but I think I will enjoy it more. Not that working in residential and then commercial can't be done, I just don't want to prolong my earning potentials.

    Hey hvacman, what part of Carolina? I'm located in Charlotte.
    Last edited by Ctuck; 04-22-2013 at 05:18 PM. Reason: left out info

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    7,093
    Unless you have another offer somewhere else take the job. With a wedding, a wife, and a kid in the future you need to start stacking some money up somehow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    3,185
    Quote Originally Posted by Ctuck View Post
    Well I am 26, 6'3 and slim. I'm also about to get married next year and probably have a kid in the next three. I have a feeling my height will affect me worse off in residential. Also I am trying to think of my career and future and from what I have read the money is in commercial. I know it will have its challenges but I think I will enjoy it more. Not that working in residential and then commercial can't be done, I just don't want to prolong my earning potentials.

    Hey hvacman, what part of Carolina? I'm located in Charlotte.
    No offense but if you haven't worked full time in the industry yet you will not impress anyone with your approach.

    I'm also 26, 6'2" 175-180lbs, started in the industry at 19. I've worked in many, many crawls and attics, I've never been fired or layed off(knock on wood) for a few reasons but one is that I don't get uppity, complain, moan or think that having certain kinds of work are beneath me. I've seen guys layed off with more experience than me on several occasions because the boss knew he could depend on me to do the work that needed to be done. Last week I troubleshot a grounded 3 phase compressor at a comcast site(changed it out), checked the phase on scrolls at a church that had the main panel changed, balanced the airflow on a new unit start up per engineers specs(also helped install that unit) and spent two days installing a new furnace in an attic that was 4' at the peak and the old one had been hacked in.

    I recently interviewed with a commercial intensive company, we'll see if they hire me, out of about 50 resumes one person got interviewed. I was interviewed because I already have close to 7 years at a professional level in the industry, meaning limited baby sitting and liability for them, already knowing what I'm doing on light commercial/resi so they can start working me in with guys on bigger units, I'm licensed by my state and have my NATE cert, EPA card, I own my tools about 5-6K, I have a proven track record with all my previous employers who are listed as contacts for them to call and have all vouched for me before.

    Let's pretend you applied to that company... You just got destroyed. Especially if you went in there saying you weren't working with anyone because you didn't think crawl spaces or attics would suite you, you were holding out for the dream land of commercial where you believe every thing is always wide open, an escalator will bring you and a floating tray of tools to the unit where it's been pressured washed to keep you from getting dirty. Now you might think, well I wouldn't say that to them of course, don't worry they can sense it and will figure you out in no time if you do get hired on for a tryout.

    Might sound kind of harsh but start thinking with the mind set that you will have to dig, grind and work your tail off to earn every single inch of what you want, not that it's going to fall into your lap.

    Best of luck to you, seriously.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    353
    Mason hit it dead on.

    I'll add that I am 6'2" and my company does residential and commercial. If you think you are going to escape tight spaces in refrigeration you have no clue. Crawling around on the dirty floors in cramped kitchens, cramming your body into refrigerated cases, and squeezing into a small closet to get at a protocal rack.....these happen to me quite frequently. One of our guys had to crawl inside a Hussman case to replace a TXV.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    7,093
    You're getting into the wrong trade if your main concern is being comfortable and making lots of money. Try Wall Street

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    11
    What I have been told from my instructors and the way they make it out when they talk about commercial vs residential its a whole different world. I've never had experience in this trade so excuse me as coming off ignorant to the trade. I've done my share of sh*! work from erosion control to 8 years of auto body and paint work. I'm not looking for an easy way out or to get rich, but I am looking to work in something I enjoy. Since I am currently in school and have the chance to learn commercial side vs residential I will if I should. My question was if I should get the experience for the summer with this residential company if my future goal is refrigeration, since every company I apply to is asking for 3-5 years for a commercial job. Read carefully

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    2,155
    Simple answer is yes. You don't have a job. It's in the field, even if not your final goal. It will give you experience.

    You were upfront with the owner. Tell him you will give it a shot. With no experience, you never know, you may find it is exactly what you want to do. If not, you haven't "set yourself back" only gained experience.
    Don't worry zombies are looking for brains, you're safe...

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