Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    5

    Crossover HVAC guy looking for advice for continuing education

    Hello guys, I have 12 yrs in the HVAC industry, the vast majority as a residential and light commercial tech, but the company I started with at the tail end of last summer has some commercial clients with refrigeration equipment. I have occasionally worked on refrigeration equipment under a previous employer, but it was so infrequent, that I couldn't really get a feel for it. If I ran into a problem and had a question, the owner/manager could usually walk me through the issue, but due to the infrequency, I never really felt comfortable with the R. Unfortunately, I feel my new boss knows even less, and honestly, I think we both know we're a little over our head on some of the more complicated refrigerant issues that arise sometimes. I hate that feeling, and want to learn more about the particulars of R systems.

    I want to know what I can do on my own time to learn more about the equipment and become comfortable and confident when dealing with it and make myself more valuable to my current and potential future employers. I came into the HVAC field the apprentice route, no formal in-class training, mostly in the field training with occasional training seminars and update classes by manufacturers of residential equipment. Universal EPA license. I wouldn't be opposed to taking classes, but I don't think I could balance traditional classes with my workload, which is always 40 plus hrs in "slow" seasons and much more in "money" seasons, not counting on-call rotation. I would love to hear any advice you guys have for online resources, preferably free, but if you know of any paid "at your own pace" online resources/classes that you highly recommend, I would like to hear about them as well. Heck, if there's an "old-school" book that is a must buy, I want to hear about that as well!

    Thank you in advance for your help.

    Edit: after posting, scrolled farther down the forum and noticed the pro forum. Not sure if my request is misplaced here, but I will register with the pro forum now.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    5
    No option to edit now, so I will self-reply as an edit.

    The pro forum registration is not short and sweet, so I'll have to wait on that. Any help that can be passed along in this forum is still greatly appreciated, will try to contribute and earn my pro credentials in the mean time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    19,571
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    843
    Regarding classes, Copeland does 1 to 3 day seminars all around the U.S. as well as self-paced courses. Google "copeland training" and follow the emersonclimate.com links.

    Since you're located in Georgia, I recommend attending Heatcraft factory training in Stone Mountain GA. I haven't been, but have always wanted to go. I hear that their training is outstanding.

    In commercial refrigeration, Copeland compressors and Heatcraft evap & condenser units are most prominent.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,448
    If you plan on working on any ice machines, Manitowoc, Scotsman, and Hoshizaki have almost all of their service manuals online.

    You could also check with local wholesalers. One of our wholesalers hosts manufacturers classes in the evening every once in a while.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    You'll do fine. Use the resources already posted and just get out there. You already understand the refrigeration cycle and how and why it does what it does. Most manufacturers have pretty good tech support lines, use them. This site is a fabulous resource as well. As long as you keep learning and learning you'll do fine. Good luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Cleveland
    Posts
    611
    The most important thing to learn is to use temperature instead of pressure. Temperature is a constant across all refrigerants so it gets less confusing.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event