Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10

    Battery backup for tankless water heaters? Hot water during power outages?

    I have a Navien NR-240A tankless water heater. My reason for going tankless had to do with the location of my HVAC equipment closet, which is on my SECOND floor. I purchased a tankless water heater in the hope of avoiding the kind of major water damage which a conventional, tank-type water heater can cause when it has a leak. The biggest downside to my tankless has been having no hot water during power outages -- e.g. the 11-day outage caused by Hurricane Sandy. NOT fun. Recently I came across information online about a new battery backup system for tankless water heaters. It's called HUGO http://hugo-powersupply.com Unfortunately, the only information I can find on this product is provided by the guy who's trying to sell it. Though the info and videos he provides seem credible. If you have any knowledge of this HUGO product, or others like it which can provide MULTI-DAY BATTERY BACKUP for a tankless water heater, I'd really appreciate hearing about it!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,336
    If this is an electric heater, forget about a battery. The battery would be a mega watt in size.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    I have the same water heater. I have a small 2000watt Generac Inverter generator that seems to work well for both my furnace and water heater. I think the load is only about 150Watts on the Navien when running at maybe 1/2 load, probably 80 Watts when just recirculating and maybe 20 Watts in standby.

    Multiday? Maybe with a good sized solar panel to recharge it. Otherwise, get a chaep generator. If you jsut want to run this and maybe a couple lights and a TV a 2000watt generator like I have will work great. Just enough power for the smallest 5-6k BTU portable AC unit, a rerigerator, coffee machine, microwave or toaster oven.... one at a time. Sometime the KISS method is best.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    As for water damage...well, a leak is a leak. I don't see a tankless causing significantly less damage than a tank unit. Unless the water is shut off, the amount of storage is irrelevant, sicne hte volume of water is dependant o nthe size of the leak and the service water pressure, not storage volume. In and upstairs install you really should have at minimum a pan on the floor with some sort of switch that triggers a solinoid to shut off the water supply to the unit. Ideally a floor drain piped to that closet. When you go on vacation of more than a couple days... IMO, you should always turn off the tankless and turn off the main water supply to the house. Then flush the lines of stagnant water for a minute or so on the furthest fixture on hot and cold side when your return.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Northern tool sells these systems. http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...ackup-packages

    Figure 50-60% of the rated battery capacity since you don't want to destroy the batteries. So a 80 AH system would give you 5 hours of tankless run time for 11 days. That's probably only 2 hours if left in standby. But add a small genertor 8 hours a day and you could also run a a couple small appliances at the same time and a few light. Use LED's or incadenscents, not flourescents. The pwoer factor on flourescent ballasts is terrible and can causes problems with generators and inverters.

    The Hugo system looks pricey, isn't portable and requires permnant installation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for your speedy and helpful response, motoguy128. My tankless has a built-in leak detector and automatic shut-off device, which is why I opted to go with it as opposed to a conventional tank water heater. I realize nothing is foolproof, but it seemed like a safer bet given the fact that it's on my second floor and I'm concerned not only about damage to my first floor but to the condo underneath my first floor (it's technically a multi-family dwelling).
    Thank you for your tips on how to reduce the chance of water damage when I go out of town.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10
    -

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10
    Great tips for those who can use generators.
    The Hugo system costs $335. I'd also need to pay to have it installed, though the wall-mounted installation looks very simple (there's a YouTube video showing how to install it). Thanks again for your help, motoguy128.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10
    -

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    10
    Thank you, motoguy128. You're lucky you're able to use a generator during lengthy outages. I forgot to mention in my original post that I can't use a generator because the condo association rules prohibit them. That's the only reason I'm looking into the Hugo tankless water heater battery backup system. Not sure if you checked out the Hugo website. It's supposed to be able to power a tankless for 40 minutes a day for 7 days. It uses a 12-volt battery with an inverter. The company owner says it is compatible with my Navien tankless NR-240A. Though when I called Navien they said they know of no battery backups for their units. If anyone reading this knows of another viable, non-generator option for me, I'd love to hear about it...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,619
    the condo assciation could cry all they wanted i would have a small generator .also a power inverter at your car with a extension cord would work
    We really need change now

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    725
    If you are planning for the hundred year flood; think standing pilot, storage water heater.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Then the battery option might work fine. You may just want to disable the recirculation feature during an outage since it causes the unit to fire periodically ot keep that 1/2 gallon tank or recirculation loop warm. Also use hot water only for showers, take them in a series so the water stays hot in the lines. Finally, turn the temp down to 105-108F, that's warm enough to take a shower with the water set fully hot. The unit will use a littleless power that way as well. Actually, I set my unit at 113F in winter and 110F in summer and let the built in heaters in hte dishwasher warm the water the rest of the way. The lower to water temp, the less scaling and higher effciency you'll hanve. It's also safer too since under 115F it takes like 2 minutes. I find 110F is still hot enough to dissolve great when hand washing any pots and pans too.

    Just my $0.10 and experience with the same water heater.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event