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Thread: Rusted bolts

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    hey guys. sorry for the confuseing post i was beat after work i knocked out while writing it but to clear it all up. the original contractor used steel bolts so they are rusted out beyond anything so one of our techs has to remove the bolts and replace them with stainless steel bolts. you cannot tremove the nut so he just grinds off the nut, so now you have the hex head with the shaft of the bolt still in the flange it wont budge some slide out after tapping them and soaking them but others wont budge. today i spoke with him he said with the grinder he cut a fine slit in the edge of the flange and lightly pry it open while tapping them out. i guess thats working for him. i was curious to see what others do in this case.
    I think cutting the flange is a very bad idea. I would tap those bolts out with a punch, drill them out, or whatever. Cutting the flange would not even be an option to me.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    I think cutting the flange is a very bad idea. I would tap those bolts out with a punch, drill them out, or whatever. Cutting the flange would not even be an option to me.
    i can see where your comming from. i was curious to know i was there to replace 2 compressors on the rooftop as he was working on that. he said when he taps the bolt the pvc wants to crack. i was thinking a portable vise with a metal pin on the bottom side of the bolt then 2 small spacers or mini sockets on the top side with the hex head of the bolt in the middle of the 2 sockets then you get the vise and clamp down on the whole rig in wich the pin will push the bolt up and out since you have the spacers it will travel a few inches before hitting the other side of the vise...... if your still following me lol

  3. #16
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    If that thing, whatever you're working on, is valved off and drained, then cut all of the bolts at the same time and just work the entire pipe and flange until all of the bolts fall right out.

    I know exactly what you mean. I've never done it, but I could see how maybe you could do that with a c-clamp and a short piece of pipe.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  4. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    If that thing, whatever you're working on, is valved off and drained, then cut all of the bolts at the same time and just work the entire pipe and flange until all of the bolts fall right out.

    I know exactly what you mean. I've never done it, but I could see how maybe you could do that with a c-clamp and a short piece of pipe.
    I think he is making it more of a mission than what it really is. He is a union pipe fitter for about 13 years so I don't wanna go up on his ladder n tell him much. I'm just getting into the union but I've worked for a non union shop where the owner will throw me on anything n I better find a solution, one thing I must say it made me well rounded. So I don't tell him much but he has been on this for about a week now

  5. #18
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    Mar 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    I don't tell him much but he has been on this for about a week now
    Well, I haven't seen the site and I don't really know what he's up against, but I'd be lying if I didn't say I mentally face-palmed when I read your last statement.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  6. #19
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    13 year pipe fitter? On this for a week now? Wow. He could have cut the whole flange, rust bolts included, out and put a whole new one in in a half day. $100 an hour, or more, for a week? I'd be one pi$$ed off customer.

  7. #20
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    An electric, or pneumatic impact wrench will likely solve the problem as well.

  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    13 year pipe fitter? On this for a week now? Wow. He could have cut the whole flange, rust bolts included, out and put a whole new one in in a half day. $100 an hour, or more, for a week? I'd be one pi$$ed off customer.
    I think it was a quoted job to make the repairs I hear the office is mad he is there so many hrs but I'm sure it's cheaper to just cut out the whole flange n install new with new bolts, but hey it's not my part I was gonna help n seer what I can doo

  9. #22
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    Don't forget to sprinkle some talc powder on the new stainless bolts, otherwise they could get galled up on the installation process....

    Been dealing with stainless steel fasteners my entire adult life, was a marine/boat mechanic before making things cooler....
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  10. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    Well, I haven't seen the site and I don't really know what he's up against, but I'd be lying if I didn't say I mentally face-palmed when I read your last statement.
    Mentally face palmed....love it.

    How sad is that? A week??

  11. #24
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    try loctite freeze and release

  12. #25
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    gt what about never seize? is talc powder better?

    r404a

  13. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by r404a View Post
    gt what about never seize? is talc powder better?

    r404a
    IMHO it needs to be rated for stainless, not the moly crap you find in the hardware store.

    Stainless rated anti seize has stainless and graphite in it, not moly and copper.

    If I had to choose between regular old anti seize or lithium grease, I would choose the lithium.

    Talc works well because it does not alter the torque ratio for critical fasteners.

    I use Safe-T-Eze stainless formula, they also have food grade stuff which is PTFE.

    Working around wineries and vegetable processing plants, you have to be mindful of what products you use.

    Talc works well and technically food grade.

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

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