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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    Glad to see that quality installs don't have to be oversized !!!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    Posts
    5
    Good looking job. I don't install a lot of 80%'ers anymore. Every once in awhile though.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    No trap on the AC drain?

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Western MA.
    Posts
    508
    Why bother,it`s on the positive side of the blower.
    I love overtime I just hate working for it.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    To me it is a 3/4" hole in my ductwork. I would patch that. I understand your reason.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Fremont, Ohio
    Posts
    29
    You have to put a trap on the ac drain in some counties around here, even if its positive pressure. I'd prefer not to have them, lots of service calls with a plugged up drain for no reason. Now it's different if its draining outside or on an air handler but I'm just saying your typical basement install it's silly. imo

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    2,125
    We still do about 15% of our installs as 80%ers. We have a lot of oddly constructed century homes around here where venting a 90 is basically impossible. AFAIK we are required to trap every job around here whether it needs it or not (except with drain pumps, sump acts as trap). One city around here (Broadview Heights) requires an air gap in the drain line.


    Good? Bad? I'm the guy with the gun.
    Good? Bad? I'm the guy with the gun.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Anthem, AZ
    Posts
    52
    We are in Phoenix, and we have a hard enough time getting people to even replace their furnace, more less going to a high efficient one. They get turned on for maybe 30-50 days a year max, so there is little pay back. 95% of our replacements are 80% furnaces

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Dallas Texas
    Posts
    26
    Down here in texas most of all furnaces are 80% ers as well. should i be selling 90's. dont really see the need here. could of got em a new filter cab as well i mean wtf everything looks good why leave the old space gaurd in there

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    3,078
    Quote Originally Posted by thejoshtx View Post
    Down here in texas most of all furnaces are 80% ers as well. should i be selling 90's. dont really see the need here. could of got em a new filter cab as well i mean wtf everything looks good why leave the old space gaurd in there
    Why charge for a new filter cabinet? Sounds like a ripoff to me.


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  11. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,686
    why replace what is still good? I "recycle" all the available good parts for my customers' installs - media cabinets, humidifiers, air drops, etc.

    IMHO, replacing good materials and charging for it, is gouging the customer and padding your profit margin.
    ~~
    Nest is poo...

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    1,093
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    If you look at the venting tables and look at the input for low fire, odds are it will call for b-vent connector even indoors, if one wants to be technical.
    It even gets more tricky than that when one is following the NFGC. This map is showing the 99% winter design temperatures for the U.S. Depending on where you are on this map determines if you are allowed to even use single wall for a connector. In the colder parts of this map you are not allowed, must be double wall B-Vent. An approved insulated flue liner is what I assume you used in the masonry chimney.

    Personally, I would have installed a float safety switch in the overflow drain outlet (that is factory plugged). That's only because I have personally seen what a backed up condensate drain line can do when it's undetected. I like that you elevated the cooling coil off the floor to allow for better condensate drainage and pitch for the drain line.

    John

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