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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    112

    Hmm Performing Carbon Monoxide test for PM CHECK?

    I considered purchasing the ACM3 Fieldpiece adaptor for my HS26. I also looked into the SOX3 combustion analyzer for fieldpiece. Both are quite expensive, the SOX3 being close to $300-$400. If I was to perform a simple "Carbon Monoxide test" what would be the most cost effective and effective way of doing so. These are for routine PM checks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Cleveland
    Posts
    605
    Spend the extra money and buy a real analyzer. You can get a testo or Bacharach without the printer and not spend too much. It's a great investment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    2,859
    Quote Originally Posted by Hvac216 View Post
    Spend the extra money and buy a real analyzer. You can get a testo or Bacharach without the printer and not spend too much. It's a great investment.
    X2 and take a class to learn how and why to use it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,628
    x3.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    I'd forget about the Fieldpice combustion analyzer stuff, get a real combustion analyzer, and use it every time you are working on a combustion appliance, be it a repair or a PM.

    Some would say that you shouldn't even be working on combustion appliances if you don't have a combustion analyzer.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Upper Michigan
    Posts
    3,588
    We have the fp one at work, I tried it once and it Didn't work so can't offer any advise on it but it does all the readings other than co that you need but it's hand pump. I would just invest in a real one

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    112
    Any thoughts on this device?
    http://www.sensorcon.com/products/kit-insp-co/

    link attached

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Cleveland
    Posts
    605
    http://www.trutechtools.com/testo310

    http://www.trutechtools.com/InTechHardCase


    Either one of these would be the way to go. The Bacharach is probably better. I use the testo 320 but the 310 doesn't have a removable probe which I don't like. Trust me, spend the extra money on a full analyzer. You WILL NOT regret it. If you add that with proper training you will make your money back in no time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    112
    appreciate the feedback can someone review the product I listed or know someone who have used it. When conducting a CO2 test, are you just finding out the levels of Oxygen and levels of CO (parts per million) to find out if the combustion is correct?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,628
    Quote Originally Posted by sto2299001 View Post
    appreciate the feedback can someone review the product I listed or know someone who have used it. When conducting a CO2 test, are you just finding out the levels of Oxygen and levels of CO (parts per million) to find out if the combustion is correct?
    You're constantly measuring CO,O2,stack temp and draft for 10-15minutes,watching the readings to see if they are within range and stable . Do you really want to be hand pumping a bulb 9000 times a day? Double that if you change anything.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    112
    would you happen to have instruction on performing this test? Don't you have use the bulb and pump it? Sorry I am still an apprentice.
    Considering purchasing this, performing this test is not mandatory, but just something extra.

    http://www.sensorcon.com/carbon-monoxide-detectors/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,360
    Quote Originally Posted by sto2299001 View Post
    Sorry I am still an apprentice.
    Considering purchasing this, performing this test is not mandatory, but just something extra.
    What are your intentions with this piece of equipment?

    Do you want to be able to test a furnaces and to tell why the unit is producing excess levels of CO, and then effect the repairs based on that diagnosis, or do you just want to be able to tell the home owner their unit is producing excess CO (not knowing the reason), and just sell them a new furnace?

    If your answer is the first one I mentioned, then you need a combustion analyzer like the others have mentioned, and not a CO monitor, like the one you keep referencing.

    Buy one as a personal CO monitor if you really want one, as there have been many occasions where one will go off just walking into a home. Then it's your job to find out why, and most times, it's not the furnace.

    I applaud you for your wanting to be able to test furnaces properly by doing a combustion analysis, as so many furnaces are worked on without this important diagnostic tool.

    The key is having the correct tool, and training on how to use it.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by rundawg View Post
    What are your intentions with this piece of equipment?

    Do you want to be able to test a furnaces and to tell why the unit is producing excess levels of CO, and then effect the repairs based on that diagnosis, or do you just want to be able to tell the home owner their unit is producing excess CO (not knowing the reason), and just sell them a new furnace?

    If your answer is the first one I mentioned, then you need a combustion analyzer like the others have mentioned, and not a CO monitor, like the one you keep referencing.

    Buy one as a personal CO monitor if you really want one, as there have been many occasions where one will go off just walking into a home. Then it's your job to find out why, and most times, it's not the furnace.

    I applaud you for your wanting to be able to test furnaces properly by doing a combustion analysis, as so many furnaces are worked on without this important diagnostic tool.

    The key is having the correct tool, and training on how to use it.
    The CO monitor I referenced comes with a pump to insert into flu pipe or furnace. If you place it accordingly the numbers alone should tell you if its running at "correct" levels. As you mentioned, it could go off when you walk into a customers home, but you should be able to narrow down where its coming from. How will the other devices referenced by other users tell me why the unit is producing excess levels. I just want to be able to tell the customer whether its running at suitable "healthy" levels or not. I want to be able to take down the levels to give customer piece of mind that its running at satisfactory levels.

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