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Thread: Chiller techs

  1. #14
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    Mar 2011
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    North Carolina Piedmont Area
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    455
    Quote Originally Posted by Trehak01 View Post
    Anyone here have any good reads on chillers that someone who doesn't have much of a clue could read for starts?
    How much time you got?

    You better save your penny's to buy this book!

    For any books to purchase, you only need the ISBN Number: ISBN: 0-8247-0992-6
    Attached Files Attached Files
    But I am still learning and looking for a new mentor.
    _______________________
    In a strict sense troubleshooting is not part of the repair..........understand the symptoms and you will find a solution.

  2. #15
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    Oct 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by alcomech View Post
    How much time you got?
    this is the slow season for us.. I have been averaging 6 hour days at work the last 2 months.. thank you

  3. #16
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    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    Slow season? Winter/Spring is the balls to the wall season for us, we just got done running hour heads off rampent with ECT and I think between the four of us we have 160 units and about 100 buildings. Stress Stress Stress... What everyone said is true it takes a lot of door knocking and discipline to get someone to open the door for you but once youve got that door open a whole knew world of opportunities arises in the chiller field. I used to be a grocery store guy and I will never go back to that. I'd rather throw a cvhe on the floor over a long weekend while my wife is having a baby on single time then go back to that!

  4. #17
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    Mar 2007
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    3,140
    Quote Originally Posted by ryan1088 View Post
    That makes 3....
    X4

    I'd say like 1-3% of the guys out there working for the manufacturers got their start on big centrifugal and screw chillers. The other 97-99% worked their way up through the ranks of the split system and rooftop circuit. For those who have an aptitude, a willingness to learn, and an attention to detail, they rise to the top pretty quickly. For others, it can take years.

    OEM service tends to be more focused on the chillers and controls, so the density of chiller and control techs is higher than with mechanical contractors and commercial service companies. Lots of these guys are going to be hanging it up in the next ten years, so there will be opportunities for advancement.
    The key to happiness is lower expectations.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,756
    Quote Originally Posted by Trehak01 View Post
    Are working on chillers that complicated? I am asking out of curiosity I have wanted to learn how to work on them and venture off into that part of the industry for some time, but i feel that i need a few more years of residential experience. what would someone like myself be looking at coming from about 4 years of residential and commercial ac work to going and working with chillers?
    I don't think it's so much of chillers being complicated as opposed to parts being very expensive. I would want someone who is likely not to make a 50,000 dollar mistake. Opps I hooked the compressor up wrong just take it outa my check.
    My name is TooCoolforschool and I am a chronic over charger.

  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    X4...
    i told my wife about this thread. she said: "Well, I guess I'm glad it's not porn."

    I replied: "You're right. It SHOULD be porn! But it's not...I think that's wrong somehow."

    I still got in trouble...not sure how.
    "If you pull one more stunt like you just pulled with Tommy, you won't have to get on a plane because I will personally kick your ass from here to Korea!" - Best of the Best

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Not in Iran
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    1,111
    I will tell you how I got where I am, I am a mechanical contractor,
    I have been spending my own profits on schooling- I have been to over 30 Trane classes, and let me mind you, theses classes are not one day classes- some are 2day and some are 6 week classes, I also spent 4k to go to a teardowns class, along w constant reading and following up WITH continuing reading and classes,
    The main thing is that u have to b a go getter, the chiller business is and can be scary, stressful especially if u don't work for a manufacture because as u already read, if u bur n up a motor, OH ****- u want to kill ur self and ur reputation just Went out the door- along w taking 2 months to get a new one from factory and installed- yes 50k is not pocket change-!
    Also u have no one to call for help!! SCARY IT CAN BE!!!
    But u have to want it!!
    Go get it daddyo
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    Truth is if a company sends you out blind to work on this stuff without any support you probably should find a new place to learn about this equipment. That tells me no the contractor does not value their customers at all. It's a tough cookie to break into but once you're in you're in. Same goes the opposite way and it doesn't take much to wash yourself out of this side of the trade.

  9. #22
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    Mar 2010
    Location
    Morgan Hill Ca.
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    1,235
    I am going to respond very candidly and may sound like I am coming off like a self important dick...

    So I guess in short, using another prick card.

    I have worked for one of the big three and was considered a chiller tech of sorts, that being said, I did not think of myself as a "chiller tech".

    I have done several tear downs on several different machines, large and small, have overhauled high speed centrifugals, low speed centrifugals, done some rotary chiller, York, Carrier, Trane etc.... That being said, I knew it was something I did not want to do for the rest of my career.

    I could become a full fledged chiller dude today, I choose to know a little bit of everything, not everything on very little.

    Just today I worked on some Carrier 23XL 280 ton rotary machines that I found, to be quite frank, a major POS.

    Anyway, I have found that in most cases it is asking the right questions and getting on the right job opportunities. Being a chiller guy IMHO is not for me, it is definitely not for everyone, many times where I work, the chiller techs are considered to be somewhat a dying breed, the only reason i say that is because the newer generation of chillers are more disposable than the days of old, there will still be a ton of work to do, but these machines are getting smarter every day it seems.

    I work on chillers (speaking water cooled) about 15% of the time.

    Stick to your guns if it is something you really want.. One seldom gets something one never ask or worked for.

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  10. #23
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    Mar 2010
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    Morgan Hill Ca.
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaron604 View Post
    Truth is if a company sends you out blind to work on this stuff without any support you probably should find a new place to learn about this equipment. That tells me no the contractor does not value their customers at all. It's a tough cookie to break into but once you're in you're in. Same goes the opposite way and it doesn't take much to wash yourself out of this side of the trade.
    It is on the tech's shoulders to learn it on their own, not necessarily the other way around. If you want the work, you need to be doing the research, nobody held my hand coming up through the trade, I found myself reading manuals and O and M's as recreational reading.

    I don't know why it is the newer generation thinks they have to be sent to all the schools BEFORE they get their hands dirty... It is just not how it works.

    Just piggy back this on my previous prick card..

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  11. #24
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    Aug 2009
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    Prattville, Alabama
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT Jets View Post
    I am going to respond very candidly and may sound like I am coming off like a self important dick...

    So I guess in short, using another prick card.

    I have worked for one of the big three and was considered a chiller tech of sorts, that being said, I did not think of myself as a "chiller tech".

    I have done several tear downs on several different machines, large and small, have overhauled high speed centrifugals, low speed centrifugals, done some rotary chiller, York, Carrier, Trane etc.... That being said, I knew it was something I did not want to do for the rest of my career.

    I could become a full fledged chiller dude today, I choose to know a little bit of everything, not everything on very little.

    Just today I worked on some Carrier 23XL 280 ton rotary machines that I found, to be quite frank, a major POS.

    Anyway, I have found that in most cases it is asking the right questions and getting on the right job opportunities. Being a chiller guy IMHO is not for me, it is definitely not for everyone, many times where I work, the chiller techs are considered to be somewhat a dying breed, the only reason i say that is because the newer generation of chillers are more disposable than the days of old, there will still be a ton of work to do, but these machines are getting smarter every day it seems.

    I work on chillers (speaking water cooled) about 15% of the time.

    Stick to your guns if it is something you really want.. One seldom gets something one never ask or worked for.

    GT
    I think you ought to put that card back in your pocket .... and save it for when you really need it! The great thing about this trade is, if you enjoy troubleshooting and problem solving, there's something here for you.

  12. #25
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    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
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    2,145
    Quote Originally Posted by GT Jets View Post
    It is on the tech's shoulders to learn it on their own, not necessarily the other way around. If you want the work, you need to be doing the research, nobody held my hand coming up through the trade, I found myself reading manuals and O and M's as recreational reading.

    I don't know why it is the newer generation thinks they have to be sent to all the schools BEFORE they get their hands dirty... It is just not how it works.

    GT
    I could not agree more! I still consider it enjoyable reading material. Learning about new products, learning about things in the trade I'm not familar with, and reviewing things I've forgotten. It's also why I spend time on this site. And seeing the number of people who share their knowledge and experience here tells me I'm not alone.

  13. #26
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    Mar 2010
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    Morgan Hill Ca.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    I think you ought to put that card back in your pocket .... and save it for when you really need it! The great thing about this trade is, if you enjoy troubleshooting and problem solving, there's something here for you.
    Honestly I rewrote that about 8 times because I didn't want to piss anyone off (too badly)...

    I was going balls deep at first.
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

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