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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    16

    Leaking Walk-in Cooler

    Went to a service call where the customer complained about their walk-in cooler not cooling. Upon arrival, hooked up gauges and noted very low pressures. Furthermore, I could hear a tiny hissing noise coming from somewhere behind the compressor along the back wall. I finally found this on the 1/4" liquid line (against the wall)...not quite sure how this would happen?

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    Anyways, cut out the section of copper and brazed connection...pressurized with nitro, checked for leaks, evacuated and charged...problem solved.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,567

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Vibration and abrasion.


    You could have probably fixed that?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,579
    Not all that uncommon
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    16
    I see..that makes sense. This was the first time I came across this type of problem...and didn't realize this was common.

    Quote Originally Posted by ryan1088 View Post


    You could have probably fixed that?
    Maybe I could have brazed that section, if thats what you mean by fix, but there was about 2" of thinned out wall. It made more sense to me to cut out the piece...cleaner, quicker and used less silfos.

    What you all think, cut & braze or just braze?

    Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk 2

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,381
    I would of brazed it

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    The Pas, Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    212
    The pipe was rubbing against something if it could slide or something was rubbing against the pipe. Watch out for doors being propped up against it etc. Should be able to see same kind of markings on what caused the problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,595
    I would have fixed it in place also.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,579
    OP, It's common where linesets are not properly secured. Many times when the LLS energizes, the initial jolt of refrigerant going thru the line will cause a vibration.Also common when installers use use precharged linesets and stack the leftover coils on the roofs, on top of the box, or in the celing.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    I would have cut it out, in most cases, not much more time to do and just looks better. I have fixed them in place with equal success, 100 degrees and 5 calls waiting, but prefer to cut them out. That's just me though. Both are fine.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    99
    it's a very very rare case, even if the lines are not properly secured to the wall or other stuff around, the vibration shouldn't be strong enough to cause such an abrasion from over time. I would say the lines they used when it was installed were already damage in that portion, and with overtime abrasion, it rubbed out a hole. But yea for better result, I would cut it, although that takes alot more time when you have to vacuum, and recharge the system

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    44
    Usually get stuff like that on distributor tubing rubbing up on one if the rungs or some nonsense. Don't see it happen on a wall often... I'd have patched too tho. Quick pump down, drier swap, patch, open receiver valve and let her rip. 15 minute fix.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    474
    You did the right thing. Only takes a few more minutes to cut it out and replace it. I've been on a few calls working on roofs in -20 temps and 40mph winds where someone brazed over the rub through and it leaked out the blob of weld again 2 years later. Of course at the worst time.

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