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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Georgia
    Posts
    65
    I would use the basics to determine your operation. If the compressor was knocking then debris is a possibility, to me, a drier makes sense. After evacuation add back your recovered amount plus the required amount to compensate for the drier. (use drier mfg. chart).
    At that point in restart use the basics. Condensor entering and leaving to determine heat rejection. Calculate subcooling in the condensor to insure liquid feeding. Entering and leaving of the evaporater along with suction superheat. Finally be sure your compressor voltage and amperage readings are in line. After all that, then maybe you can experiment with water rate flows and see what happens. Even though it is a cap tube system you might want to consider a sight glass after the liquid line drier.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,732
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfdog View Post
    I wouldn't want to disillusion you, but few people read the profile right away.

    Back up, make peace, and try again. You got off on the wrong foot....maybe. Or you tripped and broke your ankle.
    It's up to you.
    I followed the rules. Can't help it if others don't or are too lazy to read a profile. This forum isn't my first rodeo, to use an old adage. It *is* the first one where the first reply post is an attack with no bearing.

    Quote Originally Posted by CCSPIERCE View Post
    I would use the basics to determine your operation. If the compressor was knocking then debris is a possibility, to me, a drier makes sense. After evacuation add back your recovered amount plus the required amount to compensate for the drier. (use drier mfg. chart).
    At that point in restart use the basics. Condensor entering and leaving to determine heat rejection. Calculate subcooling in the condensor to insure liquid feeding. Entering and leaving of the evaporater along with suction superheat. Finally be sure your compressor voltage and amperage readings are in line. After all that, then maybe you can experiment with water rate flows and see what happens. Even though it is a cap tube system you might want to consider a sight glass after the liquid line drier.
    Thank you, good person. So I should use the specs provided from Copeland about "5 degree F subcooling and 65 degree F return gas temperature" ? If I have these numbers will that positively insure that there is enough oil and refrigerant return for proper operation of the unit? I'm probably over-thinking the whole thing since I have no reference for what a small chiller total charge should be.

    I think the failure was probably due to the number of daily cycles over 13 years. Probably 6-10 times a day. I do have some numbers as you have stated - the drier chart, subcooling, the superheat is easy enough, and the compressor voltage/amperage. I hadn't thought about a sight glass. That would definitely give a rough estimate of saturation.

    My supplier in this area is United Refrigeration. I will get with them on Monday to look into that part. Fitting all the extras into the small case will be another story. Though, other varieties of this same system came with valves, sight glasses, and accumulators. It all depended upon the Bill of Material number (BOM) in the model code. Mine was 102 = no nothing.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    I would say yes. You made it more complicated then it is, rite now. It was working fine except for the comp noise. You have the same comp to replace it so replace it. As far as the charge you weighed out, don't forget it's not all in that tank. The recovery machine and hoses still have some too. Put the comp, valves, and drier in. Pull a good vacume. Through 10 oz in it, start it up and adjust from there. If it can't get rite from there come back with good data and we can start throwing ideas at it. Good luck.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,732
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    I would say yes. You made it more complicated then it is, rite now. It was working fine except for the comp noise. You have the same comp to replace it so replace it. As far as the charge you weighed out, don't forget it's not all in that tank. The recovery machine and hoses still have some too. Put the comp, valves, and drier in. Pull a good vacume. Through 10 oz in it, start it up and adjust from there. If it can't get rite from there come back with good data and we can start throwing ideas at it. Good luck.
    Thank you. Right now I have a holding charge installed. I want to make sure that everything is solid before I invest more time and another's money into it. It's probably paranoia, but it won't hurt. And, being cold here, the chiller isn't a huge rush.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,609
    Service valves on a 1/4 HP compressor seem like a waste of money and time. Tommy gave good advice (the 10 oz part is a little subjective, but who knows?). The 65 return gas temp is a Copeland rating to ensure proper motor cooling on a suction gas cooled compressor. It's the upper end, not a number to shoot for as a normal course of action. If, as someone stated, it is a cap tube system, then trying to charge by subcooling is going to be like peein' up a rope........

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,732
    The "who knows" part is what worries me. Everything else is basic practice and replacement as in any other system.

    Good to know about the 65 degree rating. After the beat down of the first few posts I was a little leery to ask for a clarification.

    Yes, it's definitely a single capillary tube. After the vapor is condensed it flows out the coil (1/4") and into a small bulb (about 3/4" in diameter and 2" long). The bulb exits as 1/4" and reduces to cap tube size then wraps a number of times around the bulb before terminating at the 3/8" start of the titanium exchanger.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,732

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    That "bulb" is a drier.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,732
    OK, I've never seen one like that before. I'm used to the painted things one normally sees on residential condensers. Would it be wise to remove that bulb and replace it with the new one? That is, cut each side of the 1/4" tubing and slide out the bulb, install regular drier above the remaining coil and connect the 1/4" tubing to it?

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    St Paul, minnesota
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    That "bulb" is a drier.
    X2

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    OK, I've never seen one like that before. I'm used to the painted things one normally sees on residential condensers. Would it be wise to remove that bulb and replace it with the new one? That is, cut each side of the 1/4" tubing and slide out the bulb, install regular drier above the remaining coil and connect the 1/4" tubing to it?
    Change it for sure. I would just go to united and get a SUP101, I think that's the number. Just ask for a copper spun drier, they will know what you mean. It should have 3 connections on it. The 3rd is to put a service stub on. Get a stub while you are there or just leave it out and don't cut the 3rd one open.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    125
    IMHO- if you replace the compressor, you should replace the cap tube. It is almost always a factor in the cause of the failure.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by refrepairman View Post
    IMHO- if you replace the compressor, you should replace the cap tube. It is almost always a factor in the cause of the failure.
    This is also good advice

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