Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 22 of 22
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    852
    Quote Originally Posted by jmsmars1 View Post
    I love cordless tools and one that I have been contemplating is a cordless shop vac for cleaning out condensate lines and the occasional aux drain pan. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with these as I have been seeing mixed reviews, but I would like to know how well they suit our particular field. The one I am looking at particularly is the Milwaukee 18v since I already have many of their tools and batteries. I always hate hunting for a receptacle and dragging around cords. Any feedback appreciated.
    Hi there, I know your question was about shop vacs but one awesome tool I discovered that you can put in your tool bag and works great is the Gallo Gun CO2, Just google it, it will blow pretty much any drain line free and you dont need a bulky tool, has anyone used this.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Lamar, SC
    Posts
    814
    Quote Originally Posted by RACMT View Post
    Hi there, I know your question was about shop vacs but one awesome tool I discovered that you can put in your tool bag and works great is the Gallo Gun CO2, Just google it, it will blow pretty much any drain line free and you dont need a bulky tool, has anyone used this.
    Sounds like a good idea if I could trust that all the fittings were properly glued together, which I find many times some are not glued at all. I would be worried about blowing something apart in a wall or somewhere I couldn't get to to put back together. Seems kind of risky to me.
    "If you've eliminated all other possibilities whatever remains must be the truth."

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    852
    Well, all I can say is I have one and Ive used it over 50 times without any mishaps. You buy a box of cartridges, throw it in your tool bag and for applications where you know the integrity of the piping is good or you have access to the whole length of drain line the gun works great, its one of those things you can take into tight places and get the job done fast. The trigger is levered with a piercing valve so you can press down all the way for one full blow full pressure or you can press it half way and stop and you can ease off on the pressure, its one of those things where its good to have in most application but no all, just like a shop vac.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Lamar, SC
    Posts
    814
    Its not very expensive so I will probably give it a try. Thanks.
    "If you've eliminated all other possibilities whatever remains must be the truth."

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    852
    Just some safety precautions not implying that you dont already know this but I feel obligated to tell you.

    Do not put the nozzle on any part of your body
    when using it to clear out lines, where safety glasses and be aware of the crud that may come out
    and like you said about non glued lines be carful
    all in all its a great tool for the bag.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    380
    You forgot one important safety advice. Verify that drain terminates outside and not to lavatory. This can be a very nasty surprise. Learned that many years ago and have not forgotten. Lucky for me the HO was remodeling the bathroom

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    852
    lol, there should be a thread just for personal mistakes over the years I'm sure we all would have some laughs.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    OKLAHOMA
    Posts
    143
    I had and like both , just hate how much the batteries cost. Don't think you can go wrong with either one. Good luck

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Mesa AZ
    Posts
    16
    The Dewalt 18V cordless vacuum is on of the best investments in tools I ever made....wet or dry...blows or sucks....cord or cordless.....perfect size for most small jobs.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.
Comfortech 365