Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    northern Ohio
    Posts
    113

    ice on the floor

    i have been doing this a while and still haven't found a quick/easy way to get ice off the floor/shelves/product boxes ect. when you find a condensate pan that has been overflowing for a few days in a walk in freezer. I've used shop vacs with torches, hammers, mauls, shovels, electric chippers, chiseles, salt/calcium pellets, and every one turns into a major pain. I just spent over a full day in a 10 x 10 walk in freezer that had ice 4" thick at the back wall to a thin layer at the other end. The product and shelves needed cleared off as did the wall. One of the other techs at our shop spent two days with a helper at a store a few months ago, he said "dress warm, take lots of short breaks to stay warm, and get a helper." None of our customers are able to shut the freezer down while this is done because at best the box is about half full or more. I also have an account that has frozen grease/dirt from tow motors on in the active lanes of thier freezer that has been there so long it looks worse than an old drag strip.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,146
    The easiest way I've found is to walk away... And let it evaporate over months or years...

    Guess I've never been ask to remove the ice. Always told the customer that its there problem. Pretty sure none of them would want to my labor rate to chip ice.

    But if I had to do it, I would say use a 3 pound hammer and a screwdriver or chisel

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Central WA
    Posts
    1,490
    Hammer for the big chunks, the boxes will be used eventually, and the rest will sublimate over time...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    No good way. Can't turn the freezer off is a crock. They may not want too but can't is a no go for me. If the comp locks up guess what. The freezer is off. If they won't let you shut it down clear the drain and leave the ice for them to deal with. If their product is so critical that it will thaw out and be lost in 4-5 hrs, over half of that time still below 0, then they should have a stand by freezer rite next to it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    The Pas, Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    212
    It doesn't solve the problem but leaning on the pen when you write up the bill will help a little next time around.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Dchappa21 View Post
    . Pretty sure none of them would want to my labor rate to chip ice.

    Agreed. If they ask, my response is "I'd be more than happy for you to pay me to remove the ice" No one has ever taken me up on the offer.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    The Pas, Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    212
    Had a small walkin freezer that had froze up so bad it took out the evap fan blades and motors. The biggest problem was the freezer was packed so full the door couldn't close. The shelves were empty at the back but too many frozen donuts were piled in the doorway to get to them. 240 mile round trip to see this so a lonngg explanation about freezer loading helped in the labour end of the bill.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,547
    If it is just on the floor, let the walk-in reach temperature, then break it up and sweep it up.

    If the ice is soft and warm, it will be wet and sticky. At 0 to -10, ice is nice and dry.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tenn
    Posts
    139
    According to the Montreal Protocol, you can melt ice burgs with R-12, of course when I tried it prior to 1993 it only cooled off the Coke. Seriously, however, I find the best way to melt the large amounts of ice from walk ins involves the most junior cook and a heat gun. Once the junior cook has warmed the edges it is usually engh to pick up the piece and throw it into the sink with hot water. On a few units the discharge gas can be sent straight to the evap, like a heat pump only manually done. These often get warm enough to melt the drain at the evap.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    99
    tell them the freezer isn't even going to freeze stuff with that much of ice at the coil, it's not even freezing at this point. If you really can't turn it off, what i would do is chisel off the big chunks, try to get the small chunks out as much as possible, then just burn the **** outta the coil

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by Dchappa21 View Post
    The easiest way I've found is to walk away... And let it evaporate over months or years...

    Guess I've never been ask to remove the ice. Always told the customer that its there problem. Pretty sure none of them would want to my labor rate to chip ice.

    But if I had to do it, I would say use a 3 pound hammer and a screwdriver or chisel
    Dchappa may have the right idea. With proper defrost and fan control, the frost can sublimate, going directly from ice to vapor without actually melting. It will reclaim the cold of the ice to refrigerate the box at the same time.

    Attachment 368261
    In an infinite universe, not only are all things possible, all things are necessary

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    121
    Here's the after picture of the same job.
    Name:  after.jpg
Views: 239
Size:  36.7 KB
    In an infinite universe, not only are all things possible, all things are necessary

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Nice

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event