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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    73

    To NATE or not to NATE

    Our company is starting to get into the NATE mode again I was curious what you guys think about it. After going though the core it reminds me of school all over again.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    near knoxville tenessee
    Posts
    184
    i never did the nate thing. I have a state warm air license. If that isnt good enuff to bad. After 20 years in this business im to old to care about school. I realize its a good thing but ive seen many bookworms that dont know a dam thing about HVAC and have all these patches down there arm. Looks good for the customer but doesn't mean a dam thing. There are no book tests or classes that can replace experience. Dont get me wrong, i have seen 20 year techs that dont know jack but they are usually the ones that jump from job to job after the boss figures out there worthless but again the patches dont tell you that either.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake Ronkonkoma, New York
    Posts
    660
    For the most part I agree with johnqpublic. Some people are not mechanical. But if you are good at what you do then further education can only make you better. You need to have good reading and math skills. But they can be brushed up pretty quickly if you are serious about learning.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    toledo, ohio
    Posts
    62
    We have the star certification here in Ohio which is the nate equivalent ... I held it for 10 years.. it didn't do anything for me.. now instead of an on line recertificationit is a proctored exam in Columbus.. I am letting it lapse .. no point in maintaining it.. I have a city card, state license in HVAC and backflows. Until there is a benifit for it ..... He gone...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    73
    Atleast I am not alone in thinking that part of nate is useless. I went to school and it gave me a great BASE to start my career. I have seen plenty on ppl with an education and they just cant seem to put in practice. Some are just not mechanical and other half does not have confidence in thier decision making abilities.

    I do see the companies stand point of have "certified something or other" for advertising.

    I asked my boss if I get a raise for passing the test and he just looked at me. Lol Then said if I fail I pay for the test and the re-test.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    73
    my bad I should have broken into three sections those who aren't mechanical, those with no confidence, and those that are over confident and become parts changers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Mechanicsville, Virginia
    Posts
    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by passintyme View Post
    We have the star certification here in Ohio which is the nate equivalent ... I held it for 10 years.. it didn't do anything for me.. now instead of an on line recertificationit is a proctored exam in Columbus.. I am letting it lapse .. no point in maintaining it.. I have a city card, state license in HVAC and backflows. Until there is a benifit for it ..... He gone...
    I've decided not to renew my nate certifications for the same reason.

    From a consumers point of view, documented credentials are important, but no one has ever asked me for any. Unless that happens I don't need it.

    My company is licensed as an HVAC contractor by the state, and I passed the EPA certification to legally handle refrigerants. This is all I need to go to someones home or business with the assumption that I'm a well trained, licensed and certified, Professional HVAC Technician. After i'm there, all I need is to gain the customers trust.

    I don't need anything else so why should I bother? I got better things to do with my time and money.
    "If perfection is your goal, you may end up with good enough, what might you end up with when good enough is your goal?"
    efficientcomfort.net

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    Not
    A
    True
    Example

    haven't seen the nate police since mine lapsed (the company had a sh!t fit and paid for me to recertify) it's a scam- pushed by manufacturers, there is no policing of nate certified individuals that keep doing the same stupid stuff.

    ever had a customer inquire whether you were nate certified or not?
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    So. Cal
    Posts
    58
    I just recently became nate certified. From what I read nate was formed bye the manufacturer to decrease the amount of warranty components they were sending out. Instead of losing money they would educate the people installing their equipment and hopefully reduce warranties, and increase customer satisfaction. My question is why would you need to retest? If you take some classes you will not need to retest.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Caledonia WI
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaronn View Post
    My question is why would you need to retest? If you take some classes you will not need to retest.
    As long as there is still a buck floating around in your wallet someone is going to try to extract it. After a while it just gets sickening.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Mechanicsville, Virginia
    Posts
    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaronn View Post
    I just recently became nate certified. From what I read nate was formed bye the manufacturer to decrease the amount of warranty components they were sending out. Instead of losing money they would educate the people installing their equipment and hopefully reduce warranties, and increase customer satisfaction. My question is why would you need to retest? If you take some classes you will not need to retest.
    Actually I support NATE in what they are trying to do.

    I don't get enough classes to qualify for not retesting. The internet is my class but it don't qualify
    "If perfection is your goal, you may end up with good enough, what might you end up with when good enough is your goal?"
    efficientcomfort.net

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Lamar, SC
    Posts
    631
    I think NATE gives the customer a little extra confidence in the technician, whether it is justified or not doesn't really matter. People in the industry can argue among themselves all day long if NATE has merit or not, but if a customer has a choice between 2 companies and all other things being equal the one company has NATE certified techs and the other doesn't that gives them an advantage, and IMO that is where the value in NATE is.
    "If you've eliminated all other possibilities whatever remains must be the truth."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Sterling Heights, MI
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaronn View Post
    I just recently became nate certified. From what I read nate was formed bye the manufacturer to decrease the amount of warranty components they were sending out. Instead of losing money they would educate the people installing their equipment and hopefully reduce warranties, and increase customer satisfaction. My question is why would you need to retest? If you take some classes you will not need to retest.

    As long as you earn 60 continuing education hours in EACH SPECIALTY you have, and before the expiration date, you don't have to retest. So, that means getting 60 for air conditioning and 60 for heating as a basic example. They say some credits overlap, but that's not easy to determine when you find training. Some credits are free, some at low cost and some at high cost and they come in one and two hour increments. That means from now until the 5 years are up, daily you are looking for credits. All that will cost you an unknown amount, not counting gas, lodging and time off unless your company pays for it. It gets worse at finding credits with specialties like oil and hydronics. You may not find what you need locally either.

    By attending the annual educational conference of RSES, you earn 16 CEH's. NCI classes and recertification classes offer 8 CEH's. Others may as well.

    You still have to prove the 60 credits and pay the fee to NATE per the number of specialties you have, because some classes will not be preapproved by NATE, meaning they don't have the 8 digit number and signin sheet submitted by the trainer. Send in the copies of certificates you get and hope they are acceptable and before the expiration date.
    Better Service Through Knowledge...
    RSES, The HVACR Training Authority. www.rses.org

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