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  1. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchoolMech View Post
    You need to regulators or do you just use the nitro for both?
    Nitro regulator with an adapter to fit CO2 drum.

  2. #67
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    Sep 2005
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    Hmmm... I have thought before of using CO2 instead of N2. Lessee if I understand all I think I read in this thread:

    1) CO2 can be purchased at supply houses in a bottle, similar to N2
    2) CO2 comes in a liquid form and boils off as used.
    3) CO2 can be used as a purge gas for brazing w/out oxidation issues.
    4) CO2, of course, is not flammable.
    5) CO2 operates as an inert gas as N2 does.
    6) CO2 could be a 'drying agent' as N2 when doing multiple step evacuations.
    7) CO2 can be used for pressure testing, I could pressurize a system to around 200 PSI from a normal CO2 cylinder.
    8) CO2, when purchased in a bottle in liquid form, would last a LOT longer than N2 in gas form (the N2 bottles I get have around 2200-2300 PSI... and last through 2 or maybe 3 installs or repairs).

    And a side note: Anyone know what CO2 costs in comparison to N2 and where to get it... and how long a cylinder (bottle) lasts?
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  3. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    Hmmm... I have thought before of using CO2 instead of N2. Lessee if I understand all I think I read in this thread:

    1) CO2 can be purchased at supply houses in a bottle, similar to N2
    2) CO2 comes in a liquid form and boils off as used.
    3) CO2 can be used as a purge gas for brazing w/out oxidation issues.
    4) CO2, of course, is not flammable.
    5) CO2 operates as an inert gas as N2 does.
    6) CO2 could be a 'drying agent' as N2 when doing multiple step evacuations.
    7) CO2 can be used for pressure testing, I could pressurize a system to around 200 PSI from a normal CO2 cylinder.
    8) CO2, when purchased in a bottle in liquid form, would last a LOT longer than N2 in gas form (the N2 bottles I get have around 2200-2300 PSI... and last through 2 or maybe 3 installs or repairs).

    And a side note: Anyone know what CO2 costs in comparison to N2 and where to get it... and how long a cylinder (bottle) lasts?
    All of this is true, ASSUMING that you use the dry grade of CO2.

  4. #69
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    Atlanta GA area
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    All of this is true, ASSUMING that you use the dry grade of CO2.
    THX JP... I will remember to specifically say 'dry CO2' when inquiring about it.

    Honestly I get tired of swapping N2 tanks every couple of repair/installs. Would be nice to have a tank that lasted for 5-6-7 times.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  5. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post

    THX JP... I will remember to specifically say 'dry CO2' when inquiring about it.

    Honestly I get tired of swapping N2 tanks every couple of repair/installs. Would be nice to have a tank that lasted for 5-6-7 times.
    Your supply house probably won't know anything about it.

    Asking at a welding supplier got me more results.


    Coleman grade is what we use as a refrigerant, and I'd it is clean and dry enough for that purpose, I'd be perfectly willing to use it as a purge gas.

  6. #71
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    Feb 2013
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    north georiga
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    won't you lose bottle pressure as co2 boils off?

  7. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidj001 View Post
    won't you lose bottle pressure as co2 boils off?

    Maybe a little.

    It depends on the temperature. I've used CO2 as low as -10F with no problems.

    It helps to run hot water over the cylinder.

  8. #73
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    Jan 2008
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    Texas
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    I paint cars occasionally, using a regulator with a glass jar plus a drier inline to keep moisture out. Not that I would use air but a drier would remove moisture.

  9. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by fliks View Post
    I paint cars occasionally, using a regulator with a glass jar plus a drier inline to keep moisture out. Not that I would use air but a drier would remove moisture.
    Yes, but it would also defeat one of the purposes of using CO2 which is to reduce costs...

    Now, if you could find a way to refresh that drier.... Like by heating it up under a vacuum to drive the moisture out of the dessicant material, you could use it over and over again.

  10. #75
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    Jan 2008
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    Texas
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    The glass jar at the regulator catches most of it. I have painted 4 cars with the same drier and still have it. I do realize the pressure is alot lower although.

  11. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by fliks View Post
    The glass jar at the regulator catches most of it. I have painted 4 cars with the same drier and still have it. I do realize the pressure is alot lower although.
    Compressed air has a LOT more moisture in it.

    Even the "dry" compressed air you are using to paint with would likely be very wet compared to dry nitrogen or CO2.

  12. #77
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    Oct 2002
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    Lexington, NC
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    Been thinking on this a little, and I am thinking that D Natured Alcohol may be a good flush. I used to work as a Tool Maker, and we would use D Natured Alcohol to clean precision instruments and measuring blocks, etc. It evaporates really fast and cleans things that you think are already spick and span. I imagine it is still flamable, but maybe a little less intimidating than the word Methanol.
    Quote Originally Posted by glennac View Post
    Funny just substitute methanol for Rx11 and there you have it. Simple no problem no hassle and no different from Rx11. Who ever said you can't use air air? I use nitrogen but I would see no problem with using air also just to flush out a line set. Methanol evaporates very fast just like Rx11 and I'm sure Rx11 is flammable to but you go ahead and use Rx11.

    I suspect Rx11 is just methanol with a different name and a price 10 times as much. To each his own. I have no problem with using either one other than the bottom line the price. Here is a kit from John Stone Supply with a refillable can for putting your flush in and of course they sell you a can of Ace Power flush which is also good, use it up and then use methanol after that for a lot less. Thank you, thank you very much

    http://www.johnstonesupply.com/store...odB16-846.html
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  13. #78
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    Sep 2005
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    Atlanta GA area
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    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    Been thinking on this a little, and I am thinking that D Natured Alcohol may be a good flush. I used to work as a Tool Maker, and we would use D Natured Alcohol to clean precision instruments and measuring blocks, etc. It evaporates really fast and cleans things that you think are already spick and span. I imagine it is still flamable, but maybe a little less intimidating than the word Methanol.
    D natured or De-Natured alcohol would be my choice if a 'proper' flush was not available.

    There is always the consideration of the manufacturer and their warranty... I suspect if Copeland got a bad pump back and tested it (I doubt they test them all), and found residue of a chemical not on the approved list... they would be quick to dis-allow the warranty. Then again... there is corp profits involved here.

    Best IMO to just use the proper product and charge the customer accordingly.

    If the customer does not want to pay for the work... well get a disclaimer signature and/or back away and go to the next customer.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

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