Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    7

    I want a Refrigeration Cruise Ship Job!!! Badly!!!

    Hi everyone, I"m from Toronto and I've been in the trade 10 years. I have my refrigeration license and full heating license and I would love to get work on a cruise ship. I was hoping someone out there would be able to help increase my odds of getting a refrigeration job in one. I have already applied online to Royal Caribbean and a few other places that had postings. I'm not one to sit around and wait for something to happen so I thought I might be able to get some hep out here. Has anyone out there done it and could give me advise? I would appreciate as much info as I could get. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    190
    I'm not interested in working on cruise ships but, I'd love to learn more about that type of work as well. Well, not necessarily the work but what a typical work shift is like and how often you're out there. I know Carrier also does work on ships but I'm not sure if they have guys that are dedicated to just that or how exactly that works.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tenn
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by slewis View Post
    Hi everyone, I"m from Toronto and I've been in the trade 10 years. I have my refrigeration license and full heating license and I would love to get work on a cruise ship. I was hoping someone out there would be able to help increase my odds of getting a refrigeration job in one. I have already applied online to Royal Caribbean and a few other places that had postings. I'm not one to sit around and wait for something to happen so I thought I might be able to get some hep out here. Has anyone out there done it and could give me advise? I would appreciate as much info as I could get. Thanks.
    Contact the Seafarers Union. If you want to work out of the U.S. you will need your TWIC card. The galleys will have air cooled condensers, but all the AC and walkins will all be water cooled. If the ship goes south of Florida expect to run the salt water overboard, often called the "Leslie Valve", in manual and completely open. Since hermetic units are sensitive to electrical frequency and shipboard generators fluctuate a lot, expect that that will need replacing from time to time on reach ins. Expect a lot of zinc replacing and water lancing the condensors. The cooking is either steam for the kettles etc, or electrical. Don't expect gas fired equipment at sea. When I was in the Navy, 400 ton chillers and I am told that civilian ships use them a lot.

    Back to getting the job. Most non Navy/Coast Guard ships are union. They will start you off very low unless you have some sea time to count. The rotations vary. If you work 6 months out, you will be in either 6 months or so. I personally have no desire to return to sea, but if you want, PM me and I know I have some of those books around here, somewhere.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    7
    Hey Bobby, thanks a lot for posting that great info. I'll definitely look into theSeafarers union to see if they can help. What kind of information do you have in your books?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,645
    "Out to sea" said by someone who sounds like they have been there.
    My name is TooCoolforschool and I am a chronic over charger.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tenn
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by slewis View Post
    What kind of information do you have in your books?
    The books are tech manuals for things like York 400ton centrifical A/C's and Carrier Marine Pack Refrigeration compressors and shipboard stuff like that. I have copies of Carver and Worthington closed couple pumps and split case pumps used on ship. Usually the feed, or salt, water is a split case and the cooling loop uses a closed couple pump. I have bunches around here somewhere. I wouldn't give up my last copy, but several I have extras.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,154
    For five years in the mid 80s one of my accounts was the M/V Sun Princess. I went aboard once a month for inspections and rode it whenever there was a breakdown or major repair. Also spent time on the Island and Pacific Princess as well. I am here to tell you, shipboard work is not what it's cracked up to be. The working conditions in the A/C flat were miserable. When the ship was in the Caribbean it wasn't unusual for temperatures to be in the low 100s. Since "my" ship spent most of its time in the Caribbean I got to experience the heat on a regular basis.

    The officers (which included the electricians and a/c guys) were British. Their work shift was 4 hours on and 8 hours off, seven days a week. So one worked one of three shifts 8-12, 12-4 or 4-8, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They might have had a day off now and again, but I believe it was rare. When I was on board I worked 12 hours a day, seven days a week.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    La.
    Posts
    280
    Ship work is hard, remember that mechanical rooms do not rent out to customers so they are packed into as little space as needed. The rooms are tight and hot. Your help will be from overseas, because they are cheap labor. You will work 12's or more if broken. Trust me, you are not hanging out on the upper deck during your off time. But, the money is good if you do not mind the travel. American flagged vessels will be higher paying but the same work. Hard to have a family and do that kind of work.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    103
    And if something goes wrong out there you are on your own and prts are scarse.

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