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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,248

    Sink Holes in Fl.

    I am hoping to hear from contartctors that are familiar with home building in Florida.

    I cannot understand how anyone can fall through a floor when the ground gives way. Explain it to me.

    In this area of Texas, concrete foundations have thick beams every 20 feet with rebar at a 24" grid, all tied together. Even if itis tunnelled underneath, as plumbers sometime do, the rebar would hold the concrete together. At the very least, how could a person or a bed fall past this rebar reinforcement.

    Most all the weight on a small house is at the perimeter walls. The house, in Florida sinkhole incident, was fully intact.

    Maybe Florida construction is different.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    2,129
    Saw a Nat Geo progam one time about all of the underground water ways down there in Florida. There is a butt load of them. They were everywhere or at least everywhere they filmed. Kind of scary building with that underneath you.
    Don't worry zombies are looking for brains, you're safe...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Panama City, FL
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by timjimbob View Post
    I am hoping to hear from contartctors that are familiar with home building in Florida.

    I cannot understand how anyone can fall through a floor when the ground gives way. Explain it to me.

    In this area of Texas, concrete foundations have thick beams every 20 feet with rebar at a 24" grid, all tied together. Even if itis tunnelled underneath, as plumbers sometime do, the rebar would hold the concrete together. At the very least, how could a person or a bed fall past this rebar reinforcement.

    Most all the weight on a small house is at the perimeter walls. The house, in Florida sinkhole incident, was fully intact.

    Maybe Florida construction is different.
    I understand exactly what you're saying. That unsupported section of the slab should not fall away like that. Of course, that house looked to be 35+ years old, so codes were different, maybe. I've seen slab erosion where a whole corner of the house is undermined and hanging out in mid-air, and it didn't even crack the stucco.
    You can't learn a thing with your mouth open.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,815
    Maybe the house didn't have a slab. Maybe it had a sand floor...some people roll funny that way down there.
    "Politicians are the lowest form of life on Earth. Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politician"

    - General George S. Patton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,077
    I often wondered what happens when you drill for oil , by the millions of barrels , which has to be leaving a void , if the earth would one day begin to implode ....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,397
    A 30 foot wide hole is pretty substantial.

    I doubt seriously that a bit of rebar will hold your slab up over a hole of that size.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    968
    Reminds me of a subdivision I heard about. Put the rebar in the framing, call for inspection, pass, move the rebar to the next hole and pour,
    Never argue with a crazy man.

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