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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12

    Cleaning the coils in a Goodman air handler

    Hi everyone,

    I have a Goodman air handler in my attic that is easily accessible. I've posted about a situation I had recently where condensation was dripping out of the tray. First tech said water was condensing on the cold freon tube and put some putty around the opening where the tube enters the air handler. didn't work. Second tech said fan was blowing across the drip tray, blowing bits of water into the duct, where it fell and leaked out. He reduced fan speed to "Medium" using the wires that connect to the controller. leak stopped, but air volume was pretty low, just enough to cool the Phoenix house. But when winter came, the heating didn't work well enough any more. The furnace is gas, and the fan was so slow you could barely hear it. Also, the heat would shut off. Tech came, said that is because there isn't enough airflow to cool the heating burner, triggering the safety cutoff (which he recommended I replace now that it's been activated). He noted that the coil was very dirty and clogged, a fact I had not known about, and which the first two techs had not considered or noticed. He said I will need to have it cleaned, and we put the fan speed back up to a higher level to allow more flow. This worked for the heat problem, and the heat works great.

    SO NOW FOR THE QUESTION.

    If you have any thoughts on the above, I would love to hear, but my big question is this. With this air handler, an older (10 years old or so, if memory serves) Goodman unit, I'm told there is no access to the coil to clean it easily, and it will require freon to be evacuated and then the coil cut out for cleaning and then soldered back in after, for about $. I have looked at the unit and there don't seem to be any doors that can be opened to reveal the dirty side of the coil. But, I was thinking that I could cut an opening in the side of the unit, and access it that way, then seal the hole later with a well-sealed sheet of aluminum. Can anyone tell me if this is feasible?

    Thanks a lot...

    Steve in AZ
    Last edited by beenthere; 03-05-2013 at 07:33 PM. Reason: price

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,048
    Do NOT cut a hole in that furnace.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,123
    Won't get you to the dirty side.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12
    The tech shot a photo through a small hole to show me the coil. Isn't there any way to get to it without having to do what I described above? What would the experts do?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,123
    Each situation is different. So can't tell you cause i can't see the set up.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,048
    I would pull it and power wash it then try and upgrade the filtration system that allowed it to get dirty.

    Even if you could access it in place ....if its that dirty.....cant get it all out anyway.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,188
    this is not a diy situation.

    nor is this a diy site.

    I would worry that removing, and reinstalling
    coil could hasten a leak. since you can't
    seal coil leaks...you'd be installing a new coil.

    tech can't clean coil in place? some clean would
    be better than no clean.

    best of luck.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  8. #8
    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum, and only Pro members that have been vetted by the AOPC may post advise, commentary, or ask questions of the OP here.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Further infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Last edited by beenthere; 04-25-2013 at 07:01 PM. Reason: Non Pro * Member

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12
    I found out I know someone who can clean it in place. I always figured it would be possible. The top of the Goodman unit was easy for him to open without cutting it -- it must've been done before because it was sealed closed with some messy putty. He opened it, cleaned it out, and sealed it much more neatly than it had been before, and also sealed a big gap underneath that no one had known about.

    Thanks for all the input.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,123
    J Fresh23, this is the Ask Our Pro's forum, and only Pro members that have been vetted by the AOPC may post advise, commentary or ask questions of the OP here.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Your post has been deleted.
    Further infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,665
    the only way get a evap coil completely clean is remove it and clean it
    We really need change now

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