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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    New Jersey before and after Texas
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    65

    Frown Refrigerant to cool compressor windings

    I piped a compressor discharge to an oil cooler (a small cup containing drain water from freezer and a copper coiled discharge line submerged), then to the oil port on the compressor, and finally out of the other oil port to the condenser to return through the suction line. Compressor dome stayed cool to the touch as the suction line. This drastically eliminated any waxing problems with in a cap tube system and allowed the compressor to run cooler.. Any suggestions as to why this isn't a normal hook up in manufacture literature?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    New Jersey before and after Texas
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    65
    It was a domestic refrigerator/freezer using R134a...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Tallahassee, FL
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    6,051
    Built by frigidaire the cup is how if evaporates the water from defrost cycle and is not a desuperheater unless it is so humid that cup is constantly replenished.

    The correct oil cooler arrangement takes the liquid from the last 1/3 of condensor and runs it through compressor.

    As you piped it discharge can actually heat up the compressor if no water is in that cup.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Jersey before and after Texas
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    65
    Quote Originally Posted by SBKold View Post
    Built by frigidaire the cup is how if evaporates the water from defrost cycle and is not a desuperheater unless it is so humid that cup is constantly replenished.

    The correct oil cooler arrangement takes the liquid from the last 1/3 of condensor and runs it through compressor.

    As you piped it discharge can actually heat up the compressor if no water is in that cup.
    True, but with the water cup full it is clearly better designed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Jersey before and after Texas
    Posts
    65

    Lightbulb

    Why not use a water fill/flow sensor teed into the dispenser line to keep the cup constantly filled with cool water? .33 is a problem repeating, I'd rather keep my cup at least .50

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Wow, are you related to FengsHVAC?
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
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    25,761

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
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    6,051
    To tee a water line? Well you would have the first watercooled upright freezers! Sounds like a mess though.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    4,485
    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph'bidness View Post
    This drastically eliminated any waxing problems with in a cap tube system and allowed the compressor to run cooler.. Any suggestions as to why this isn't a normal hook up in manufacture literature?
    Is cap tube waxing an actual problem in residential equipment? I've never seen or heard of it happening.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,761
    Quote Originally Posted by craig1 View Post
    Is cap tube waxing an actual problem in residential equipment? I've never seen or heard of it happening.
    True wax is a leftover from the refining process of Mineral oil.

    It doesn't exist in a system with a synthetic oil.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    4,485
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    True wax is a leftover from the refining process of Mineral oil.

    It doesn't exist in a system with a synthetic oil.
    I guess we should say cap tube blockages due to oil breakdown then.

    I've never seen it happen in residential equipment.

    I believe the reason is that resi equipment runs lower discharge pressures due to the small compressors and relatively huge condensers and is usually located in a nice home kitchen that rarely sees over 80 degrees ambient temps

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Tallahassee, FL
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    I wouldn't call it wax. It was more like chalk or salt.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
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